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Radical Unschooling as a Social Movement

How Did We Get Here? a.k.a. ”another fine mess you’ve got us into this time, Ollie!”

Cliff Notes Version: wrote a blog, Come Out of the Shadows that got a little attention. A friend introduced me to Lainie who hosts For the Love of Learning, a series of online panel discussions. Lainie fell in love with “RU as a Social Movement” for a future panel topic I will be a panelist.  A non-practitioner instigator swimming with the real expert do-ers….

We need to gather input and break things down into logical sub-topics prior to the panel discussion., to help establish priority focal points and get a running start at this huge plate of spaghetti.

I’m a Big Fan of Shared Vision and this is just my musings until others join in. The ideal end result is a collaborative “what-if” manifesto with several contributing thinkers, and no one “owner”.

While this targets a specific small group of panelists, if you’ve just dropped by we’d love to hear what you think too! There are several buckets of ideas and very specific questions coming your way. I don’t go looking for traffic so this blog is a quiet little corner of cyberspace. Please feel free to comment!

Ambitious Structural Thought: it’s really frustrating when a comment thread gets so cumbersome that you can’t keep track of all the good stuff people say. For several of the big questions, I’ll create and link a placeholder blog. Follow the link if you want to comment on that question, and when I can I’ll tie the comments together in the blog space. If there isn’t a placeholder link, just comment here!

What Will the Panel Focus On?

Broadly, we will explore the possibility of elevating radical unschooling’s visibility, of building broad grassroots support for the very attainable vision of helping to create a better world. Call it a social movement because whole-life learning and subscribing to RU principles can be the catalyst for more caring and compassionate communities, creating a more sustainable society. I believe it, as you probably do. But not enough other people know that yet, and that is what we’ll discuss changing!

What Constitutes a “Social Movement”? (homegrown definition, not textbook. What’s yours?) COMMENT HERE http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8k

Movements are fueled by passionate, like-minded people who share attitudes and perceptions but more importantly, mindsets that lead to action and social change….”movement”…get it? Movements require broad grassroots support–enough critical mass to be noticed, taken seriously, and make a difference. RU isn’t there yet. We have plenty of passionate, like-minded people who mostly share the grand notion that RU can change the world. But RU lives out of sight, underground. We don’t have the needed visibility, we’re lacking critical mass. And, other than that sweeping grand notion, we don’t have a flag to rally around. Changing the world is serious business. We need details.

Even Though RU May Deserve to be Elevated to “Social Movement” Status, should it be? (COMMENT? Same as last link above)

It’s easy for me the outsider looking in to say “of course…it must”. But what about the practitioner community? What are the pro’s and con’s from your perspective? Can practitioners be convinced they are champions for a world-changing social movement, and that it’s time to come together?

Drive things down to an everyday, mainstream, grassroots level of accessibility and relevance. “Radical” unschooling (even the name is intimidating!) and other elements of human growth–mindfulness, yoga, spirituality, social-emotional learning and development, engagement, purpose, values…if RU is to go mainstream and become capable of weathering potential attacks and resistance from the establishment, John and Mary Everyman must be the real targets of an awareness-building campaign. The mainstream can be understandably discouraged, disconnected, frustrated, confused with what looks like voodoo mumbo-jumbo. They don’t know where to start, what to do.

 Develop a Communication Strategy: a coordinated PR / marketing campaign, not hit-and-miss. Sounds crass and un-un, but that’s what it is. Message consistency is essential….we really need a powerful narrative.  Following: a bunch of thoughts-in-process on messaging.

Build broad awareness, understanding, support, buy-in of these groups (COMMENT HERE  http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8p )  :

  • Private sector is essential for RU to become publicly legitimate.
  • Potential new unlearners: what are the entry barriers? What support do fence-sitters need?
  • General public: awareness leading to open acceptance and inclusion. Driven by a “Greater Good” focus, the realization that RU is whole-life with a huge WIIFM upside for everyone, all ages. RU needs a more cohesive identity, not within the community but externally with the general public. Broad understanding and acceptance of RU would lead to greater societal inclusion and unschoolers being able to practice openly, without fear. Goal: recognition of the legitimacy of RU, and of the impact potential for significant contribution by unschoolers to society and the workplace.
  • Political support, advocacy for RU-friendly policy, a buffer against a potential onslaught by current establishment authoritarians and profiteers who stand to benefit from leaving unwell enough alone. We can go up against the establishment only with critical mass, a huge grass roots support system.

Hot-off-the-presses-thought, from practitioner friend Heather: “RU a a Social Movement” is so big, should we focus our efforts on one group? What is the feasibility and the impact of influencing….

  1. Traditional education, the establishment?
  2. Middle-grounders already into some form of alt ed…charters, home-schoolers?
  3. Fence-sitters still mired in traditional education, wanting to make the Big Jump but not knowing how or where to start?

How can we build awareness and increase acceptance beyond the RU community?  (COMMENT HERE  http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8p   “Acceptance” of what, and by whom?

  • The masses. Encourage more people to embrace alternative ed as practitioners, or at least as community supporters and advocates.
  • They don’t know what they are missing…a talent pool stocked with creative, passionate, purposeful, principles-centered lifelong learners. Just the intrinsic qualities the new workplace most needs. This is my wheelhouse, the private sector can be an incredible ally if there’s greater profit involved.
  • The establishment. We’re looking at a messed up political / education policy horizon with for-profit education and privatization. How can the RU community defend its rights and with what? Non-believers will want to see proof and the more airtight the case the better.
  • The law. Compliance is a nuisance at the very least and a deterrent to more widespread practice at the worst. Needed: strong advocacy with policy makers, and the backing of a solid grass roots movement. “They” won’t be as prone to bully something they can’t whup on.

Identify factual, relevant WIIFM for each target group and reinforce with anecdotal stories, Comment here…same a last link! http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8p 

  • There’s plenty of specific “what’s in it for me” for each stakeholder group;
  • Minimize the voodoo, weird incantations, mystical-sounding labels. That’s all great for practitioners, but for the uninitiates, John and Mary Everyman (the critical mass!) it can be scary and intimidating as all get-out;
  • For both the private sector and youth development: workers deserve an exploration-intensive, creative, fun environment built on trust, honesty, respect, compassion and mutual respect. They perform at an incredibly higher level under those conditions (hey CEO’s…that means big bottom line impacts). Kids thrive in that environment too. Data on job and academic performance, and on peoples’ overall happiness and satisfaction with life is plentiful.

MORE BREAKING NEWS….tonight while I was working on this piece, I took a break to surf my Un network. There were TWO (now three!) excellent posts of resources for fence-sitters and general audience awareness, both on Facebook. Here’s the drawback: FB posts have such an incredibly short shelf life. It’s a drive-by medium, especially when it comes to information sharing. Really good stuff is gone in a fleeting moment and replaced by other stuff. Where can people go when they need to find the right RU information? A one-stop clearinghouse with multiple sources is ideal

http://www.radiantlivingandlearning.com/video-top-3-myths-of-home-education-college-life-prep-for-unschoolers/

https://www.facebook.com/ilainie/posts/10155238525627224

https://www.amazon.com/Homeschooled-Teens-People-Without-School/dp/0986229040

BARRIER? Concensus among practitioners = cat-herding. A practitioner warned me “…narrative might be hard to define – many RU’ers are anarchists, and if they aren’t they have been so jaded by the system that they are anti statists. Organization into narrative is almost antithetical. So how to get the buy in for that?

Indeed, how? We need to sing from one sheet, in one communal Voice, without the appearance of authoritarian airs or a central controlling figurehead. A really tricky balancing act…how can this come about? My opinion: through a shared, co-developed narrative. What we do, why it’s important. Clear and compelling for both the community and for the general public. Catch 22 / chicken or egg. Need a compelling narrative to rally the community, but need community to design the narrative.

Barrier to Solidarity? The RU practitioner community appears to have more than its fair share of big egos, closely guarded individuality, dueling experts, infighting…generally highly independent people. Is it a by-product of the environment / nature of the beast? Practitioners: WHY the Cowboy Culture, can it be overcome? SHOULD it be?

Barriers to Entry? What is difficult, or causes prospective new families to hesitate or back away from committing? How can the community minimize the barriers, and make RU easier to access?

A Rose By Any Other Name Still Packs Thorns. Building a stronger, unified RU community requires clear vision and focus—a compelling narrative, defining a cohesive community purpose that is principles-centered and driven by shared values. But maybe first, something needs to be done abut what we call it. There’s evidently been plenty of debate over this, so I’ll just add my neophyte perspective. “Radical unschooling” is confusing and scary as hell. And I was / am a “radical”…do you guys, like, occupy schools? Oh…you abandon them! Right ON.

Vision, Purpose, Values…What’s the Big Deal? COMMENT HERE:  http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8t

RU as a social movement would be a world changer. Humanity is exterminating itself. Not just nukes, climate change, famines or epidemics, but also extinction triggered by Terminal Lost Mojo, for lack of a better term. We’ve disconnected from our core humanness, society is coming apart at the seams.

RU: anti radicalization elixir? Ex white supremacist Christian Picciolini, author of ‘Romantic Violence: Memoirs of an American Skinhead’ noted young people are much more likely to radicalize into gangs when they have no other source of identity, community, meaning, purpose.

An Iraqi who was an anti-terrorism expert (scary fast crowd, huh?) noted that when identity, purpose, values are lacking, it is a significant enough deficiency that it makes ISIS appealing to disenfranchised Muslim youth. Was it the same for people buying into Hitler? Is it the same for people buying into our current nationalism? (sorry! I swore I wouldn’t get political…)

Identity, community, principles / values, meaning, purpose are the most powerful universal human drivers. They are right up there with love, compassion, the need to connect and contribute. Those principles are, in my opinion, where society is self-destructing. Those things are also high on the list of what makes RU work.

The Big Honkin’ Greater Good Big Deal SAME as last Comment link!  http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8t

I’ve had quite a gradual evolution over the years. But all along, a subtle awareness had been brewing. It finally came to a head. YOUNG kids are killing themselves. A beautiful young lady in my home town, my oldest grand daughter’s 7th grade classmate. I had taught him.  Suicide at any age is a terrible tragedy. Depression, anxiety, stress are increasing and out of control, and it affects kids, teens, adults. We’re killing ourselves with this modern lifestyle.

Too many good people are soured on life. You can see it in their eyes, their spirit is drained. Their expression and demeanor screams “I hate my life!” No purpose, no meaning, no fulfillment. We keep pushing our Selves further and further away from what is natural, starting with the way we raise and “teach” our children to the way we approach life as adults, including the nature of work and the meaning of “success”. We’re at constant war with our humanness, our core values. We’ve done it to our Selves from early childhood on.

We’ve disconnected from our Earth Mother. We rape and poison her in every way possible, and we’ve stretched her way beyond her capacity to support this species.  And we poison ourselves along the way. Then we wonder why we’re stressed out, miserable, literally killing our Selves physically and emotionally.

We’re doing this all wrong. RU can change the world. Am I just drunk on the koolaid? I think not (hic).

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Vision, Purpose, Values…What’s the Big Deal?

Vision, Purpose, Values…What’s the Big Deal?

RU as a social movement would be a world changer. Humanity is exterminating itself. Not just nukes, climate change, famines or epidemics, but also extinction triggered by Terminal Lost Mojo, for lack of a better term. We’ve disconnected from our core humanness, society is coming apart at the seams.

RU: anti radicalization elixir? Ex white supremacist Christian Picciolini, author of ‘Romantic Violence: Memoirs of an American Skinhead’ noted young people are much more likely to radicalize into gangs when they have no other source of identity, community, meaning, purpose.

An Iraqi who was an anti-terrorism expert (scary fast crowd, huh?) noted that when identity, purpose, values are lacking, it is a significant enough deficiency that it makes ISIS appealing to disenfranchised Muslim youth. Was it the same for people buying into Hitler? Is it the same for people buying into our current nationalism? (sorry! I swore I wouldn’t get political…)

Identity, community, principles / values, meaning, purpose are the most powerful universal human drivers. They are right up there with love, compassion, the need to connect and contribute. Those principles are, in my opinion, where society is self-destructing. Those things are also high on the list of what makes RU work.

The Big Honkin’ Greater Good Big Deal

I’ve had quite a gradual evolution over the years. But all along, a subtle awareness had been brewing. It finally came to a head. YOUNG kids are killing themselves. A beautiful young lady in my home town, my oldest grand daughter’s 7th grade classmate. I had taught him.  Suicide at any age is a terrible tragedy. Depression, anxiety, stress are increasing and out of control, and it affects kids, teens, adults. We’re killing ourselves with this modern lifestyle.

Too many good people are soured on life. You can see it in their eyes, their spirit is drained. Their expression and demeanor screams “I hate my life!” No purpose, no meaning, no fulfillment. We keep pushing our Selves further and further away from what is natural, starting with the way we raise and “teach” our children to the way we approach life as adults, including the nature of work and the meaning of “success”. We’re at constant war with our humanness, our core values. We’ve done it to our Selves from early childhood on.

We’ve disconnected from our Earth Mother. We rape and poison her in every way possible, and we’ve stretched her way beyond her capacity to support this species.  And we poison ourselves along the way. Then we wonder why we’re stressed out, miserable, literally killing our Selves physically and emotionally.

We’re doing this all wrong. RU can change the world. Am I just drunk on the koolaid? I think not (hic).

 

(back to Radical Unschooling as a Social Movement http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8h)

Build broad awareness, understanding, support…

Build broad awareness, understanding, support, buy-in of these groups:

  • Private sector is essential for RU to become publicly legitimate.
  • Potential new unlearners: what are the entry barriers? What support do fence-sitters need?
  • General public: awareness leading to open acceptance and inclusion. Driven by a “Greater Good” focus, the realization that RU is whole-life with a huge WIIFM upside for everyone, all ages. RU needs a more cohesive identity, not within the community but externally with the general public. Broad understanding and acceptance of RU would lead to greater societal inclusion and unschoolers being able to practice openly, without fear. Goal: recognition of the legitimacy of RU, and of the impact potential for significant contribution by unschoolers to society and the workplace.
  • Political support, advocacy for RU-friendly policy, a buffer against a potential onslaught by current establishment authoritarians and profiteers who stand to benefit from leaving unwell enough alone. We can go up against the establishment only with critical mass, a huge grass roots support system.

Hot-off-the-presses-thought, from practitioner friend Heather: “RU a a Social Movement” is so big, should we focus our efforts on one group? What is the feasibility and the impact of influencing….

  1. Traditional education, the establishment?
  2. Middle-grounders already into some form of alt ed…charters, home-schoolers?
  3. Fence-sitters still mired in traditional education, wanting to make the Big Jump but not knowing how or where to start?

How can we build awareness and increase acceptance beyond the RU community? “Acceptance” of what, and by whom?

  • The masses. Encourage more people to embrace alternative ed as practitioners, or at least as community supporters and advocates.
  • They don’t know what they are missing…a talent pool stocked with creative, passionate, purposeful, principles-centered lifelong learners. Just the intrinsic qualities the new workplace most needs. This is my wheelhouse, the private sector can be an incredible ally if there’s greater profit involved.
  • The establishment. We’re looking at a messed up political / education policy horizon with for-profit education and privatization. How can the RU community defend its rights and with what? Non-believers will want to see proof and the more airtight the case the better.
  • The law. Compliance is a nuisance at the very least and a deterrent to more widespread practice at the worst. Needed: strong advocacy with policy makers, and the backing of a solid grass roots movement. “They” won’t be as prone to bully something they can’t whup on.

Identify factual, relevant WIIFM for each target group and reinforce with anecdotal stories

  • There’s plenty of specific “what’s in it for me” for each stakeholder group;
  • Minimize the voodoo, weird incantations, mystical-sounding labels. That’s all great for practitioners, but for the uninitiates, John and Mary Everyman (the critical mass!) it can be scary and intimidating as all get-out;
  • For both the private sector and youth development: workers deserve an exploration-intensive, creative, fun environment built on trust, honesty, respect, compassion and mutual respect. They perform at an incredibly higher level under those conditions (hey CEO’s…that means big bottom line impacts). Kids thrive in that environment too. Data on job and academic performance, and on peoples’ overall happiness and satisfaction with life is plentiful.

(back to Radical Unschooling as a Social Movement http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8h)

What Constitutes a “Social Movement”?

What Constitutes a “Social Movement”? (homegrown definition, not textbook. What’s yours?)

Movements are fueled by passionate, like-minded people who share attitudes and perceptions but more importantly, mindsets that lead to action and social change….”movement”…get it? Movements require broad grassroots support–enough critical mass to be noticed, taken seriously, and make a difference. RU isn’t there yet. We have plenty of passionate, like-minded people who mostly share the grand notion that RU can change the world. But RU lives out of sight, underground. We don’t have the needed visibility, we’re lacking critical mass. And, other than that sweeping grand notion, we don’t have a flag to rally around. Changing the world is serious business. We need details.

Even Though RU May Deserve to be Elevated to “Social Movement” Status, should it be?

It’s easy for me the outsider looking in to say “of course…it must”. But what about the practitioner community? What are the pro’s and con’s from your perspective? Can practitioners be convinced they are champions for a world-changing social movement, and that it’s time to come together?

(back to Radical Unschooling as a Social Movement http://wp.me/p4xnz1-8h)

Lots to Learn–Ubuntu!

Even more timely now than when it was first posted. Ubuntu!

One Pond-Ripples

My Experience With Ubuntu

A few years ago I was introduced to Ubuntu by African refugees I connected with at work. And a new LinkedIn friend who was born in Africa shared his thoughts on Ubuntu. And just today a friend posted a classic Ubuntu story on Facebook.

Sometimes it seems things come together for a reason if you just open your eyes and mind. I was letting Ubuntu collect dust, it’s high time to flip the spotlight back on. We stand to learn a lot from Ubuntu.

A past employer had a good many refugees in the plant including many Africans. When we first started hiring refugees, since I was doing new hire orientations I figured it was a good idea to study up on their customs, norms, and history to be able to better connect with them on a personal level. I feel incredibly richer as a result.

View original post 573 more words

“Radical” Unschooling–Just Doing What’s Natural

I’m a radical unschooling non-expert, non-practitioner and for some time I wasn’t much more than a highly interested bystander. But I’ve become passionate in my advocacy for RU.

By default, I see my role as limited to outreach–an awareness-builder who is connected to the RU community but mostly working with the general public and private sector.

Result: I’m straddling a barb wire fence, interfacing with experts and practitioners while tailoring my message to uninitiates / neophytes like myself. Worrying about appearing to be a presumptuous, meddling outsider among practitioners, and talking over the heads of non-practitioners. As my blogs begin to find their way into the RU practitioner community, this up-front disclaimer became necessary.

The private sector is critical—we need their support and buy-in for RU specifically, and for the social movement generally. So my intent with this post is to ease private sector angst by showing how RU is very engagement-intensive, something most business leaders are quite familiar with and value highly. They should want, and they NEED unschoolers who have grown up as explorers within a creative and highly engaging environment.

As a neophyte student / non-practitioner, my understanding of the issues is limited. If I’ve  unintentionally ground any sacred cows into burgers I apologize. That said, how do you like yours cooked? Oh…I can do tofu too.

**********

This thing called “radical unschooling” confuses me. I guess it’s “radical” because it’s homeshcooling to the extreme. But it’s not RU that is “radical”. What is radical is the way we try to educate young people then manage them in the workplace, the way we expect all ages of people to happily accept an authoritarian, command-and-control governed life with absolute, limiting boundaries. The way our lives are managed for us is what’s radical, unnatural, causes health and emotion-destroying stress, holds us back from being all we can be, goes against the way we are meant to live.

“Radical” unschooling is based on the way children really learn, the way they are designed to grow and mature. That’s not radical, that sounds abnormally normal to me. Maybe the “radical” perception among the general public needs to go, starting with that inappropriate label? But it’s bigger. RU principles applied to the workplace and to society in general would trigger a radical transformation and take us where we need to go to thrive and survive. Now that’s radical!

Most of what I’ve been studying and writing about lately is how people really learn and grow. RU is the only sensible human development game in town. Then there’s the bigger picture of the desperate need for social change. A connection! “Radical” unschooling represents the springboard to radically transform our world. Thing is, except for practitioners and the occasional accidental converts like me, not enough of the right people know it. And the wrong people—the power wielding establishment—would be scared of the fullness of human development RU represents, if it becomes more than a fringe practice. Docile, compliant creatures are so much easier to control and manipulate.

Radical unschooling must become the New Normal…our profoundly destructive education practices and lifestyles need to be normalized and that will take a major shift away from this current path. There’s so much already written and over-discussed that I started doing a compilation with links and annotations for original blogs and sources, organized by topic with condensed thoughts in summary thumbnails. Very labor-intensive, it can come later. For now, big picture stuff.

Key Themes

  1. RU practitioners don’t deserve being banished into the shadows as a fringe group. RU needs to be Main Street, needs to become The New Normal. The core philosophy and principles are scientifically well-founded and they represent nothing less than the means to unleash our full potential as human beings. What’s the holdup?
  2. “New Normal” must become a highest priority social movement. At stake: social-emotional well-being for all ages which translates into less stress and fewer suicides, greater health, more and better years of life. Also on the table: higher levels of contribution and achievement (the related dirty words are “productivity and performance”) thus greater US private sector competitiveness vs the rest of the world. To be really crass….”MO’ MONEY, OK CEO’s??”
  3. RU’s benefits for young people and their families, and for the workplace and society, needs to be told in simple, concise and compelling terms to achieve broad buy-in from everyday people.
  4. There is so much cross-sector WIIFM for all stakeholders in the RU philosophy and principles that we’re damned silly if we do not systemically embrace it in every sector. The culprit is lack of understanding, no widely shared, credible information. Once the right knowledge is provided there can be no excuse.

Not-so-Radical for the Workplace

There is a clear connection between “employee engagement” and RU. The private sector fell in love with employee engagement going on a quarter century ago because the research and tons of data irrefutably showed monster bottom line enhancements across all private sector entities: a direct and significant correlation between levels of engagement and performance. But it ended up being nothing but a fling, a passion-driven affair that led to over-saturation with throngs of engagement experts hawking high-dollar wares that were nothing but window-dressing enhancements of the Gallup Q-12 model from 1994.

The private sector also flirted with Goleman’s emotional intelligence, Mihaly’s flow, Covey’s principles-centered leadership and even the military’s (seriously!) values-based leadership model. Always in search of a better way to make more money…all that is another story for another time though.

For now, here’s a quick run-down of the leadership and workplace attributes that result in gains in engagement levels, therefore impressively increased levels of productivity, profitability and every other bottom line measure the private sector worships. The findings have been verified, validated and then validated some more. “Gallup Q12” is easy to google, if you do want to learn more. If you do it’s highly recommended that you stick to the original and stay away from the imitations. Same wine, different bottle.

Top Drivers of Engagement per Gallup

I’ve taken some liberties in the wording to fold in other thoughts that came along after the original Gallup Q-12 items and to expand the relevance of the items beyond employees in the workplace. These are in no particular impact level or priority order:

  • I need to know that what I do makes a difference in the grand scheme of things;
  • I do my best work and am most productive when I enjoy the work and have a talent for it;
  • Recognition and praise are more powerful drivers than cash and other extrinsic perks;
  • Values-based relationships are important, especially trust and respect;
  • I need to contribute at a high level, toward something that really matters. Better yet if I like it;
  • I feel like I’ve accomplished something when I am challenged to use my talents and creativity.

That should be enough for you to get the idea. What needs to be made crystal clear is that these attributes of employee engagement are part of what makes RU what it is. And, for the most part, these attributes are suboptimized in traditional education. One engages, the other disengages. As someone who used to hire a lot of people, I would drool over a candidate who I knew grew up learning in the right kind of environment. Most employers are smart enough to understand that too.

“Systemic” Initiative: More Than a Buzz Phrase

You see it everywhere in the private sector, and in education improvement initiatives. “Systemic” is became the sexy way of saying “across-the-board”. To maximize results and make an idea, or for that matter for anything really take hold, it takes an all-stakeholders-on-deck effort. Isolated pockets of doing stuff is pointless. It blasts noise into the system–churn, chaos and confusion along with it. And isolated activity is unsustainable. For something to have stickiness, for the new to fully replace the old for the old “radical” to become the New Normal, it can’t be just youth development. All-hands-on-deck, systemic, across-the-board. Not isolated activity but a movement. Oh….and it makes sense too.

When it comes to changing the world, radical unschoolers can only go so far on their own.

Summary (more like the preface to the next chapter…I’m Learning!)

Traditional education is broken. It’s failing our kids and their parents, it’s failing employers and society. Kids “graduate” woefully unprepared for higher ed, for the workplace, for life. Essential workplace and life skills attributes like creativity, judgment, civic and social responsibility (principles) are not well-represented in traditional curricula. The US is behind the 8-ball in global competitiveness because our workforce is so anemic. The employment talent pool is a mud puddle and we’re losing our global status along with our quality of life (different from “standard of living” but it’s tanking too).

Kids are hard-pressed to survive being molded into bricks in the wall. So do adults. Too much suffering, stress, burnout, suicide. Stop this radical madness!

Humanity needs a radical intervention!

 

What Should the RU General Public Narrative Include?

In Part One Come Out of the Shadows http://wp.me/p4xnz1-83 I asked for practitioner input on a proposal to the RU community that RU needs a narrative, a more cohesive identity not within the community but externally, targeting the general public. Greater understanding of RU would lead to greater acceptance and inclusion, unschoolers being able to practice openly without fear, recognition of the legitimacy of RU, and of the impact potential for significant contribution by unlearners to society and the workplace. Part Two is one neophyte’s observations on what it is about RU that would be most relevant for the general public to understand.

Narrative Themes

Out of the Shadows.

RU has earned the right to more than fringe cult status with practitioners in hiding. The likely culprit? Fear of the unknown, misunderstanding among the general public. Fear of being considered weird by other kids and adults. But RU actually centers on well-established, familiar principles. There’s nothing new here to be afraid of. More on “fear factor” later.

There is also the possibility of unwillingness or inability of an authoritarian establishment to let go of their power and control. Opinion: they’re a dangerous animal when cornered. Is it just paranoia? How to deal with it beyond grass roots pressure?

We’re Working Against Human Nature.

Traditional education as well as private sector management practices are predominantly command and control, compliance-mandating systems. This is counter-productive to human development all around, all ages. We’re stifling performance and causing incredible levels of killer stress because these systems are in direct conflict with basic human nature.

We’re All In This Together.

Principles and values-centered leadership, employee engagement, and emotional intelligence are somewhat established in the private sector. RU is absolutely aligned with the same core concepts. We can leverage the private sector’s familiarity with these by focusing on similarities and minimizing the perceptions of “radical”. Nothing new here!

The Private Sector, Traditional Education and Society All Need RU.

Creativity and creative thinking and highly principled, purposeful job candidates are the most valued new workplace capabilities.  RU delivers these attributes and skills. Traditional education does not. If we continue on this course, US competitiveness and quality of life will fall even further behind the rest of the developed world.

Traditional education is not just ineffective, it is destructive.

The worst-case scenario is a looming reality: youth suicides are on the rise and a key driver is academic pressure to perform and conform. There has been so much written about this that it is a travesty and a moral embarrassment to continue on this current course (personal note: young people committing suicide is the hottest of my hot buttons, followed by the dangers of self-inflicted stress on social, emotional, physical health).

RU Needs a Narrative.

What is it? Why is it important? What’s the WIIFM for the kids, the parents, employers, society? People cannot learn unless they are compelled to invest the time. People will not invest without a clear, compelling narrative.

Principles ->  Beliefs –> Values –> Norms –> Behaviors -> Society.

I jump around a lot, from what currently interests me to what my key drivers / intent is behind my “life’s work”. Things keep circling back to values. Values are human nature, part of our DNA. They determine who we are individually and what we can become. Values give us a shot at living a life with purpose. But for some reason we’re intent on pushing our selves further and further away from what is most natural to us, from the way we raise our children to the way we approach life as adults to the nature of “work”. Then we wonder why we’re so stressed out, miserable, killing our Selves.

The collective of values becomes norms–what we are societally. We as individuals, and society as a whole, are driven by individual values that become shared norms, our common attributes of human behavior and needs no matter age or application. Young, old, school, work, society, government. Not “just” values. And quite simply, living a life of purpose has huge universal appeal and interest is growing. This is something people can believe in.

And we’ve got to find our way back to the garden.

Leverage the Data!

Old-school establishment in education and the private sector thrives on validation with data. You want results? You need data to back up the claims? No problem. But just my opinion: numbers are an addictive drug that dull the pain of using human intuition. But if you must have your fix…numerous studies of years of experience with alternative ed and workplace motivation theories bear the hypothesis out: fuzzy stuff delivers much greater hard results and higher levels of personal satisfaction. Less stress, greater longevity to boot. Need more WIIFM?

Fear Factor?

This late entry is powerful. I need to learn more about the reasons RU practitioners apparently feel they must keep low profiles. One practitioner said … it is fear of being turned in to Child Protective Services for arbitrary reasons, kind of like medical kidnapping .…family and friends are a never ending battle over whether they should or shouldn’t be doing it….some simply find it easier to stay out of the spot light.”

“This can’t be happening” was my first thought. “Is this fear factor widespread?”

“Yes, because there are enough stories circling the homeschooling and unschooling communities of it actually happening. Someone thinks the kids are being neglected because they don’t have curriculum and the parents aren’t making them do structured work. The state takes the kids and asks questions later, then the parents spend months fighting the stupid arbitrary nature of the system that can’t overlook crossing a t even if harms the child more than what the state suspected in the first place. It is not widespread, but in most cases, there is no rhyme or reason as to why “that” family.

There are facebook pages set up to help expose stories to help families get their kids back.

And then there are homeschool legal aid outfits here and there that help families fight courts over their right to homeschool. I have encountered my own opposition from a school board member, that same school board member still questions what I do and even tries to quiz (my child). It is nuts because they think we are crazy when they are the ones who are brainwashed.”

It seems society needs some serious deschooling.

 My Role: Gather and Sow

Besides getting a good grasp of practitioners’ perspectives, there are several areas where more information is needed to build the case for RU. I’ve come across much of this information in the past but didn’t see much need in cataloging it until now:

  • Worker / private sector and learner performance / achievement data relative to engagement level. We’re all in this together: RU leans heavily on principles that are fairly well-established in the workplace. It’s really not all that radical after all!
  • Evidence of the damage traditional education is inflicting: data on youth suicides and rising incidences of mental health issues among youth;
  • Life After Unschooling. How do unschoolers do in the workplace / job market, and in higher ed? What has been their role in society?
  • Non-technical information on brain theory and learning, why RU works and why traditional education and command and control management are counter-productive, even destructive.
  • The subtle as well as clear physical and emotional impacts of stress induced by the toxic school and work environments we subject people to.

(RU Narrative Support, in process)

Now, About That Data….

RU is principles-intensive. Practitioners don’t worry much about validating what they do with data, because they know it’s the right thing to do, they see the results of their efforts. A practitioner observation: “…over the years I’ve seen plenty of articles with anecdotes from college admissions people and trends that homeschooled kids went quickly from “untouchables” to “sought after” as soon as they realized that homeschooled kids perform better than their schooled peers during freshmen year. (They need much less hand holding for one.)
Now we have decades of homeschooling and data points…there are also some test score comparisons out there and I’ve never seen one that didn’t show homeschoolers performing better. Don’t have links saved or anything, but I’m willing to bet a google search (or maybe duck duck go) will give you some good hits.”

Conclusion…For Now

RU needs a greater level of public awareness, understanding, acceptance. It needs to become more firmly established as a viable approach to human development.

For the general public to buy in, the RU community needs a stronger identity, a cohesive presence that is a whole lot more than random individuals doing whatever. The community needs a narrative, and the ideal would be for an outsider to be involved in building the compelling case and serving as one of the messengers.

I’ve more than dabbled within the establishment in both education and the private sector but have no expert credentials, no real feathers in my cap. Just a regular guy who has seen the light. That’s part of my personal narrative because I have to answer the question “why should what I think, what I’ve studied, and my conclusions matter to the rest of the general population?” As an education / private sector hybrid my views are big picture, inclusive. As a non-practitioner, my perspective will hopefully be seen as objective and impartial, rather than that of an insider making a sales pitch.

I’m also someone who believes, not because I have a vested interest but because it makes sense, we need it badly, and it’s the right thing to do. Stay tuned for Making the Case for Radical Unschooling: Factoids and Anecdotals