US Health Care–Missing the Obvious

No comment on the piracy that’s rampant in the US health care system, and the grave dangers in the path our representatives are headed down….except this: INFORM, INVOLVE, RESIST! If you care, do something. Add to and change this as you see fit, copy / paste what’s below. Or share the link if that’s easier. DON’T just “like”. I don’t need credit—it’s the info that is important, but please tag me if you copy / paste, as I want to keep track of this one. And encourage others to spread the word too.

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UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE? (GASP!!) WE CAN’T DO THAT IN THE US!

Why not? Seems to work well for the rest of the world so there are abundant models to benchmark. Yet, except for that wild-haired radical from out east no one dares bring up the obvious. WHY?

A wild guess…power brokers and profiteers have something to do with it. Where we are now and the direction the railroad is taking us is blatant financial robbery and class warfare. But worse than being fleeced, we’re being cheated out of a chance at a longer, healthier, more productive and fulfilling life. That is obscene, it’s immoral.

PURGE THE PROFITEERING

Among the most powerful and well-funded lobby sectors: finance / investments, fossil fuel, and …health care. Google it. The number of politicians who are heavily invested in health care, and who stand to gain (or lose) big bucks from health care, is embarrassing. Google it.

Big pharma, big insurance carriers, even big providers are ruled by the bottom line. Our health and general well-being…our lives…are being held hostage while the profiteers decide whether there’s enough margin for them to treat what ails us, or whether we should just crawl out of sight and die somewhere.

WHAT WE NEED: Shift Priority From Treatment to Preventive

A lesson to be learned from manufacturing. One big difference in philosophy is what led to the Japanese kicking US manufacturing’s ass for a decade. Run the equipment like crazy and wait until something beaks down, then fix it? Or, keep it from breaking down in the first place? Build it right the first time, or inspect substandard stuff out and rework what can be fixed?

There’s far more to the story, but the bottom line: assuring quality and preventive action is much more cost effective and delivers a far superior product than reworked stuff that is caught by the quality cops.

Guess what? The same thing applies to the ultimate machine–the human body. The machine runs better, last longer with fewer breakdowns, and costs less to operate with preventive maintenance and quality assurance. Decades of manufacturing data verifies a huge net gain when more preventive dollars are spent. Better bottom line because there are fewer costly breakdowns and down time, less substandard output to either scrap or rework, fewer post-sales failures in the field, fewer lost or pissed off customers, fewer demoralized, disgruntled, disengaged employees. Read that last line with our health as your focus.

WHAT WE NEED: Weird Works Wonders

It’s in process, need more. Boost awareness of the more spiritual side of humanity, weird voodoo stuff that is proven to be powerful health and longevity boosters, incredible elixirs for the human spirit. It’s more than eating bean sprouts and regular exercise. Basic mindfulness, yoga, social-emotional strength, purpose and values, and meditation are not airy fairy pixie dust. The WIIFM is backed with buckets of studies and data, and “me” intensive: longer and higher quality of life.

Closing thought…..study this link, really study it. This is from 2010, but still relevant and raises two key points:

(ONE) The US is abundantly prosperous. And we spend far more on health care than any other country, yet our life expectancy doesn’t reflect it. Why? Lousy return on investment? Or profiteering?

(TWO) The US and Mexico are the only two countries with red lines on the graph, indicating no universal health care. Why?

Are the two points related?

School and Work—One Big Prison System?

Two hypotheses: (1) Forced education and the world of work is one big system of involuntary servitude with compulsory, menial, downgrading labor. Children are sentenced to school until they reach the right age, complete their probationary period and move on to the next sentence. They’re finally granted work release but if they can’t conform to the conditions of probation they are busted down and forced to start over elsewhere. (2) For society to survive we have to re-learn how to behave more like children.

I’m in search of the right way to make a meaningful contribution toward saving the world. My long-time belief is that you must tend to “people” needs or tasks won’t get done nearly as well as they could, so while ecology and environment are in the mix my priority has been the social-emotional state of the species. We’re a mess. The natural focal point is kids’ social-emotional (s-e) well-being, through the education system. But it’s got to be more than kids and education. The roots of our social issues are much deeper. A casual swim turned into a cliff dive into human development—murky! My personal passion has morphed into a big honkin’ project that targets whole-community well-being. Stay tuned.

Peter Gray is no stranger to those who are into education improvement. They’re all good, but two of his articles really grabbed me. In The Culture of Childhood: We’ve Almost Destroyed It Gray makes the case that children learn the most valuable lessons with other children, away from adults. He explains that children are biologically designed to grow up in a culture of childhood. But we’re bound and determined to go against that natural design.

In Seven Sins of Our System of Forced Education, Gray likens the current education system to a compulsory prison sentence.  Harsh, right? Accurate? Pretty much.

It’s much bigger than the education system, and the larger issues are daunting. Many of the social problems adults face are not just rooted in but are shared with childhood. Parenting and the education system, private sector management and organization, social norms, even government…all are impacted by the same forces that are working against our human nature.

One section of Gray’s “Culture” article is subtitled “The adult battle against cultures of childhood has been going on for centuries.” So has a brutal war against adult individuality, creativity, fulfillment and the ability to develop to our full potential. Pink Floyd had it right in Brick in the Wall, the movie excerpt is prophetically dark.

The Floyd Boys didn’t consult with me, so I don’t know for sure if it was by intent. But the song pertains to a whole lot more than kids and the education system. We’re all bricks. Docile, content, mediocre people are much easier to control. Good enough students, good enough employees, good enough soldiers, good enough citizens. But good enough isn’t good enough. We’re collectively being held back from greatness and some feel (I’m one) it’s actually become a survival of the species issue.

The war against children’s culture started in earnest with Francke’s system of compulsory schooling in Prussia, in the late 17th century, which was subsequently copied and elaborated upon throughout Europe and America. Francke wrote, in his instructions to schoolmasters: “Above all it is necessary to break the natural willfulness of the child. While the schoolmaster who seeks to make the child more learned is to be commended for cultivating the child’s intellect, he has not done enough. He has forgotten his most important task, namely that of making the will obedient.” (Gray)

In the early 20th century Frederick Taylor opened another huge skirmish line to break the human will in the exploding industry sector, with his theory of scientific management. “Taylor’s philosophy focused on the belief that making people work as hard as they could was not as efficient as optimizing the way the work was done.” (a simple exploration)

Taylor advocated breaking physical tasks down into the most basic elements possible, throwing an army of mindless man-machine laborers at the work. No thinking needed, just do the same exact task over and over and over. “The Principles of Scientific Management” was published in 1909, and Franck’s factory model of education was the perfectly efficient machine to produce ample bricks in the wall.

The attributes of a children’s culture are vital elements of human nature, not just for young people. Those attributes also have a great impact on adults in their parenting role as well as at work and in society. But they have been stifled. Who needs all that stuff since we’re destined for prison anyway?

School and Work—Life Sentence, No Chance for Parole

Here is a very brief summary of Gray’s reasoning that forced education is prison. I’m buying the whole package with one slight twist…the same issues are prevalent in the workplace and in society. It’s a scary thought: we’re born into incarceration and we die that way.

(one) Denial of liberty on the basis of age, and compulsory movement of an entire group of inmates (sorry, students) as they get older, provided they comply with the conditions of each sentencing period. Passing out of a grade, early probation for good behavior, valuing capability over tenure is rare. The system won’t allow it, isn’t geared up to process one-off exceptions.

(two) Fostering of shame on the one hand, and hubris on the other. Non-stop testing, formal and informal evaluations, observations, grading…all promote peer pressure and competition, coercion and admonishments from parents, teachers, management. Students and employees are either proud or ashamed of their performance, either self-assured or full of angst over their status.

(three) Interference with the development of cooperation and nurturance. Humans are social creatures; we are naturally wired to cooperate with and nurture others. But our competition -based system of ranking and grading works against the cooperative drive…helping others may even hurt the helper. (Gray, Forced Education). Further, age segregation eliminates opportunity for older to younger nurturing and increases bullying. The human tendency to care for and help each other is inhibited at an early age and these inhibitors’ damages continue through adulthood, into the workplace and society.

(four) Interference with the development of personal responsibility and self-direction. Command and control management is rooted in contemporary teaching and parenting practices. Childhood, education and employment are all incredibly disempowering when teacher, parent and boss all resort to “because I said so, that’s why!” It’s easy to fall into a comfort zone: waiting for orders and blindly complying to them. Initiative is effectively squelched, leaving behind compliance, complacency, mediocrity, lost potential. A powerful lesson: ”if you do what you are told to do in school everything will work out well for you.” (Gray) By the same token if you shut up, do your job at work and obey the law you’ll keep drawing a paycheck. You may even stay out of jail.

(five) Linking of learning (and work!) with fear, loathing, and drudgery. Along with our adventurous spirit, we’ve lost our joy. Tests generate anxiety in most….threats of failure and the shame associated with failure generate enormous anxiety…a fundamental psychological principle is that anxiety inhibits learning (Gray) Anxiety also dead-ends creativity and productivity and can lead to dangerous levels of emotional and physical stress. Lesson learned: “you must do your work before you can play” (Gray) …”how can ya have any pudding if ya don’t eat yer meat?” (Floyd)… “this report is due, don’t go home until it is.” (insert-kahuna-name-here)

(six) Inhibition of critical thinking. Even though building critical thinking skills is a stated priority in education, “most students—including most ‘honors students’—learn to avoid thinking critically.” The grading system is a huge barrier as students understand the real goal at school is to get good grades. Period. They quickly learn that the way to do that is to figure out what answers the teacher wants to hear, no matter what the student thinks. Sounds a little like the workplace doesn’t it?

(seven) Reduction in diversity of skills, knowledge and ways of thinking. Only the tiniest sliver of what is really needed out there in the real world can be even touched on in school. So our logical conclusion: everyone needs to study the same thing because we don’t have the resources to do anything else. Enter “standard curriculum”. Private sector entities, especially larger ones, are driven by the same standard practice principles, making it easier to expand managers’ spans of control. The overflowing cornucopia of individuals’ unique capabilities is homogenized, distilled, compressed into uniform bricks all who have an acceptable level of competency.

The factory model is so deeply rooted in our society and economy that we’ll play hell replacing it.

What Can Adults Learn From Kids? Can We Still Learn?

Peter Gray is a highly vocal and credible critic of forced education. He advocates alternative education methods of home schooling and unschooling, at the very least a drastic modification of current educational structures and methods. This really should be a Part Two, but a second Gray blog is just too interrelated to look at separately. Apologies for the length.

One Big AHA from Gray’s Children’s Culture  (also linked in the intro) is that the more adults learn from children and adapt their interactions with children to meet the children’s needs, the easier it will become to change our views and practices on “raising” kids in a manner that is a vastly better fit with kids’ natural wiring. Kids are better off raising themselves by interacting with their peers. So what is it about that peer interaction that works? Does it apply to adults too? I think so.

My first focus in processing Gray’s children’s culture piece was to make the connection between the elements of a children’s culture as they relate to the adult world: what can adults learn from children’s cultures? How can adopting more of a child’s perspective impact individual learning and group dynamics at home, at work, in society?

I figured it might be a bit of a stretch. But it makes perfect sense. Some children’s culture attributes we already know as elements of effective group behavior but we simply choose to ignore them because “we’re all grown up now and things are different”. Subverting natural human attributes is doing a great deal of harm not just to kids, but all ages.

Gray’s thoughts are noted by bold italics. I’ve added some ideas on adult relevance for parenting and family relationships, and work and in society.

For starters: Children are biologically designed to pay attention to the other children in their lives, to try to fit in with them, to be able to do what they do, to know what they know. That, in a nutshell, is the most powerful key to effective group behavior, any group.

Children’s cultures can be understood, at least to some degree, as practice cultures, where children try out various ways of being and practice, modify, and build upon the skills and values of the adult culture.

Adult groups are in continuous growth and change mode, at least they had better be! The worst thing that can happen to any group is to stagnate or fail to adapt to the changing environment. The social-emotional health of the group is paramount. ACTION: groups must continuously monitor their interpersonal dynamics and values. Consider initiating a conscious, formal and frequent process of checking for values alignment, interpersonal barriers, any opportunity to learn and improve the group.

My family moved frequently, and in each village or city neighborhood to which we moved I found a somewhat different childhood culture, with different games, different traditions, somewhat different values, different ways of making friends. Whenever we moved, my first big task was to figure out the culture of my new set of peers, so I could become part of it. (Gray)

Individuals change, group membership changes. It sucks to be the new kid on the block, it still sucks as grownups. The new kid asks “who are these people, what do they expect of me? Will they like me? What am I supposed to do on this job?” One of my private sector roles was to help groups transition through changes in leaders, members, roles, assignments. But why wait to react to changes? Already noted: groups should proactively assess not just progress on their goals and meeting deadlines, but most importantly their dynamics. In doing so, any group’s odds of succeeding skyrockets.

Children learn the most important lessons in life from other children. Gray lists several key lessons. All are important and relevant, all are too rich to dissect into highlights here. Read the original!

  • Authentic Communication
  • Independence and Courage
  • Creating and understanding the purpose and modifiability of rules.
  • Practicing and building on the skills and values of the adult culture.
  • Getting along with others as equals.

A Common Thread

Several of Gray’s attributes of a children’s culture pertain to group dynamics and the individual’s efforts to fit in. The same thing is true in the adult world so this macro AHA applies equally to kids and adults whether in education, a work group or any social unit: the interpersonal dynamics of a group and its collective and individual s-e well-being must be elevated in importance for any group to flourish.

It can’t be individual effort from a newcomer or the group’s leader. The whole group must be mindful that without the right interpersonal dynamics and without a high level of individual and whole-group social-emotional well-being, any group will struggle to stay cohesive and meet its goals. When the team wins every player wins. Exceptional teams even strengthen the entire league. That is vastly different from the “me” focus where the best students get scholarships and awards, and in the private sector where promotions are won or lost based on which individual looks most impressive.

This isn’t just about small groups. The same is true for the collective well-being of communities. We’re talking about global society – a network of interconnected individual communities separated only by distance and bound by shared human values and awareness of our global brotherhood.

Crazy Issues Call For Radical Response

It’s ironic. To reach our full human potential it seems we need to unlearn lots of preconceived notions we’ve formed while “growing up”. We pretty much need to relearn how to behave more like children.

There’s a lot of work to do to unseat the deeply held beliefs we have about parenting, to turn away from the factory model of forced education, to counter the traditional principles of workplace boss / follower management, to get rid of the worn-out rugged individualism of the cowboy culture and to replace it with a cooperative, collaborative children’s culture. It truly takes a village, one village at a time. That’s been the evolving focus of the Caring Communities project.

The thought is painful –our humanity is being drained from us, leaving behind empty shells of compassion-challenged, bigoted and hateful creatures. But it’s a self-inflicted illness and it is in our power to kill or at least slow down the mojo-sucking parasite. Education and work systems combined with a fast-food lifestyle beyond diet are partially responsible for the physical, mental and emotional social issues plaguing us. I’ve long thought that resolution starts with children, that we need to carefully guide them along a path of shared human values. Maybe that would help bring us out of this values-challenged skid. But how can we send an army of young, hopeful converts to the new religion out into a hostile land of godless heathens? We can’t realistically expect seeds of genuine compassion and caring to grow in our children when we are sowing those seeds onto barren, toxic soil.

Pipe Dream?

The Caring Communities project promotes social-emotional development for all ages. The intent is to have an impact on making humanity human again through providing readily available support and materials to build a stronger society one community at a time. Standard Quixote save-the-world stuff. More to come, promise.

Coming Soon: More Hugely Radical Future-Perfect Musings

This dovetails into an all-work-no-play  (huh?). Check it out if you’d like

 

All Work and No Play, Per Gray

MUST read this piece first to play along: Instead of “Job Creation,” How About Less Work? Increased automation has not reduced our workload. Why not? What if it did? Posted Nov 26, 2016 Peter Gray

This is such a utopian view of a “what if” future perfect that most sane and logical people immediately pooh-pooh it. That’s why I like it. Most of the “we can’t because” boo-birds bring up are excuses, not reasons. But it does take some incredibly visionary thinking to see the possibilities. And it will take some serious work toward big changes to seize the big opportunities.
Gray traces our devolution from hunter-gatherers to beasts of burden serving the 20th century economic model, through the ever-evolving current reality and re-birth where a hunter-gatherer society of child-like play may make sense again.

So, what’s wrong with work?

Start with the disappearing concept of “adding value”. Value to what? Value used to be defined as a product or service that someone would be willing to pay for. But “stuff of value” is more and more produced with high-efficiency automation and very little human labor. What good are we if we aren’t kept busy making or doing value-adding “stuff”?

People must still work for a paycheck to support their families, right? A new generation of work has come along—IT, bottom feeder leisure industry (computer-based games, home entertainment… most folks can’t afford high-end diversions), service jobs (root word: “serve” as in subservient). Financial and insurance sectors have huge numbers of people doing administrivial work—collecting and analyzing mountains of data, creating and issuing all kinds of reports for unknown “users” who immediately delete the work, pushing all kinds of non value-adding info that is intended to help manage something somewhere that actually has “value”. But what value does money and information by itself have? It’s the use of those things that adds value. Armies of other administrators’ existence is somewhat justified because it takes an army to make sense of inefficiencies, disorganization and an overkill of rules and regulations, and it takes a badgillion customer service reps working 24 / 7 trying to keep customers from becoming mass murderers because of those inefficiencies. (why am I thinking “Idiocracy”?)

Huge corporate law firms with huge staffs help huge corporations get away with working huge loopholes in the system to make huge profits so they can pay huge legal fees. The whole loop exists to enable generating non-product with no value. Another army—hired hitmen, lobbyists whose purpose is to grease gears and palms so all that artificial non-value is easier to generate and hoard. A famous longhaired progressive activist once chased money-changers out of the temple. We need another. Oh, just one more army: market researchers, the advertising industry and feet-on-the-street (and cyberspace) sales folks hell-bent on manipulating markets (people!) and packaging and selling non-value stuff.

One of the fads of the process improvement world was “customer focus”–identify customers and what was important to them—their expectations, needs and wants. Then do what’s needed to meet those criteria. The idea was that it would make workers more conscious of what they were doing if there was a real person at the end of their process chain. But what if there was no real person at the end of the chain? Or what if the customer really didn’t care about what you produced, but they had simply been conditioned to buy, buy, buy anyway?

Too many working adults are stuck in a job they can clearly see has no real value in furthering the greater social good, or impacting the grand scheme of things in any way. Work with no purpose. But humans need purpose, need meaning, need to feel they’re making a difference. When there is no purpose, it’s natural for people to get jaded, cynical, uncaring, worn down, worn out, quit, die. We’re dying. What if those stuck in no-value, no-purpose work were redirected toward providing something the world wants and needs? Their individual mojo would be rejuvenated, as would the world’s.

If the Goal is Less Work and More Play, Then What Needs To Change?
Not Much–Just a Few Silly Attitudes and Minor System Tweaks

A few thoughts for starters….

  • Redefine “work” as something with real purpose that adds real value for others and / or improves the condition of the world and / or society. As technological advances and automation takes care of the menial stuff, working on further technological advances adds value because it frees up humanity’s time!
  • No more “I am my job, I am nothing without my job” thinking. Work is a means to a greater end unless a person’s work is something they enjoy that happens to make the world, society, others better. (remember the old Venn diagram on “job happiness”?) My life’s work is to eliminate violence and bullying by championing social-emotional development.
  • Rethink and expand the meaning of “value” from being only a thing / material $$$ transaction-driven concept. Social value and artistic / aesthetic value, environmental and ecological value!
  • Redesign the monetary distribution model of “work 40 hours (or more) to earn your paycheck”. Why does 40+ hours of “work” constitute “full-time employment” anyway?
    There’s not enough meaningful work to go around, because our priority and our passion is profit-generating work. But there’s tons of meaningful “work” opportunities– community, social, environmental, infrastructure things needing attention. Engage people in doing good things, and pay them accordingly. While we’re at it, reinvent “pay”. Money has no value on its own but we literally kill ourselves and others over it. Broader: “currency” is something that is used as a medium of exchange. Exchange of what, for what?
  • Redefine “affluence” from having a lot of stuff for its own sake, to having what you need to be happy…how about “sufficience?” Move past the mindless pursuit of a high standard of living and focus on quality of life instead, starting with defining the individual’s values-based vision of “fulfilled” then right-sizing needs accordingly. Prerequisite: redefine what level of “success” is socially acceptable. So it comes down to an individual values and social perception shift;
  • Rethink brick-in-the wall forced education and the standard curriculum that makes school labor –tedious, compulsory work. Learning should be fun, should come naturally. Same with work;
  • Ditch crass capitalism and profit for its own sake. Demote the 1% and elevate the 99%.
    Scrap our material and transaction-based economy and the norms that go with it, norms like “work hard, get paid, get lots of stuff, support family, be a prolific provider”. Break the trance-the marketing / advertising-driven thirst for conspicuous consumption, material affluence, accumulating stuff that has no real value (see Jagger Consulting’s “Satisfaction” piece);
  • Re-invent corporate entities with the sole purpose of generating profit for investors, corporations with no value-adding meaning justifying their existence! OOPS, need to re-think investors and the investments industry, and making money playing “the market”. There’s those money-changers again! Thinking out loud: how about a reinvestment tax credit, investing in and diverting corporate profits to an approved fund to be used for the greater good?
  • Reinvent government by the people, for the people with people and planet as top priorities;
    Bring back the institutions of Santa Claus and the tooth fairy…

This sound like capitalism must go. I agree, partially—capitalism in its current form is destructive. Money is OK, money does no evil. What people do or don’t do with it is the issue. Let’s get our really smart business people and economists busy reinventing capitalism!)

Gray closes with a challenge: So, instead of trying so hard to preserve work, why don’t we solve the distribution problem (getting paid for a 40hr week as the only way to do things), cut way back on work, and allow ourselves to play?
Good question.

WHAT’S YOUR ANSWER?

“Solving the distribution problem” isn’t a cakewalk and there’s lots of other stuff that needs to happen too. I’ve shared my quick take of what needs to change just for starters. What’s missing? And how in the world are we going to do all that? Think about these bullets as goal statements then brainstorm: “what’s it gonna take?” And remember, one of the ground rules of brainstorming is “never say it can’t be done.”

(BONUS) Sneak Peek at Klitgaard: a look at basically the same thinking, slightly different angle.

Many people, affluent and poor, lead hectic and harried lives, struggling at jobs devoid of meaning and often socially and environmentally counterproductive (such as weapons manufacture, hydraulic fracturing, or financial speculation) in order to command a paycheck. In a sustainable society, work should be meaningful as well as steady and productive. Meaningful work allows people to unite their heads, their hands, and their hearts. People should have a say in the design of what they make or do, a variety of challenging tasks, and the opportunity for self-direction.
Unfortunately, the logic of capital accumulation has created work that is much the opposite—routine, without mental exercise, let alone purpose or joy—all in the name of producing more goods and services at ever-lower cost.
The Struggle for Meaningful Work

UPDATE: Johan sent a graphic with his reply (below). Since pics cannot be included in replies here it is! I’d like to suggest that on the “Child” side “work” and “play” are more overlapping and very possibly concurrent!

Johan Work and Play

 

Chillin’–a Little Background

Healing the world starts with me dropping one pebble at a time into one pond at a time.

Coming Soon. This is a preliminary draft of information on a facilitated workshop that is also an introduction to Caring Communities, an aggressive initiative which is a tiny sliver of a big honkin’ movement, the Great Transition Initiative.

  1. Chillin’ objective: provide a people-friendly, WIIFM-intensive, non-threatening introduction to scientifically validated, life-changing self development disciplines. Give participants a taste of connecting with themselves. Take the opportunity to “pitch” Caring Communities and the potential for making a broad impact.
  2. Caring Communities impacts the greater good one community at a time by championing often-ignored aspects of human development. Caring Communities strengthens the global social fabric and remedies social and emotional issues by reconnecting people with what makes us human. Emotional well-being and drives performance, productivity and economic prosperity for individuals, organizations, communities, society, the world.
  3. The Great Transition Initiative is an international network for the critical exploration of concepts, strategies, and visions for a transition to a future of enriched lives, human solidarity, and a resilient biosphere.

Chillin’ is not weird voodoo, not excruciatingly painful yoga, not mantra-chanting incense-burning meditation, not falling into a trance induced by candle-gazing. All of that is too strange for most to even think about trying. But most people don’t realize the damage done by physical and emotional pressures they may not be aware of. Most people don’t realize the incredible benefits of actively managing their mental well-being, and don’t know how easy it can be.

What if there was a way to hit a mental and physical reset button, neutralizing emotional and physical stressors that turn your brain to jell-o and can even kill you?  Simple ways to “chill” your body and mind anytime anywhere without anyone knowing, using scientifically validated techniques that have been practiced for hundreds of years? Would you want to give it a shot?

Four Essentials for Chillin’

An important note: “mindfulness” is the rage but it’s nothing more than being fully aware of something and staying focused on that one thing. Hit File Delete for all the other noise.

Chillin’ takes time to practice and learn four essentials that work together: Focus, Breathing, Posture, Routine. It’s OK to ease into things, so you can learn the mechanics one at a time. Kids can embrace Chillin’ quite readily, but most adults have a lot of catching up to do and bad habits to unlearn. So don’t lose interest if results are not immediate.

(Essential One) Focus–Mental Discipline.

An undisciplined mind can be a dictator, chaotic, unruly, a bb in a boxcar. Use focusing aids, ONE thing to direct your thoughts: the right music (a couple of examples follow) a physical object, even one thought in particular. My favorite easy Chill routine is a piece of the right music in the background while staring into a candle flame, focusing on just the flame, then slowly add a little mindful breathing.

It helps for starters if you’re in the right environment with few distractions, but later you’ll be able to focus enough to block out the distractions around you.

(Essential Two) Breathing.

You know how to breathe already but you’ll focus on it a little differently when you’re in Chill mode. First, focus on every breath—in through your nose, out through your mouth. Use your mental discipline to focus on speed and depth. Park your mind on nothing but breathing…it’s your first focal point! Slow, controlled deep, breaths.

Most people think their chests should puff out when they’re taking deep breaths. Aim lower! With your hand on your diaphragm—middle of your chest just under your breast bone—slowly fill your lungs to maximum capacity. As you breathe in you should feel your stomach grow. Deep breathing and singing from the diaphragm is used by accomplished singers because they get more power and control and are able to sing longer phrases. It works.

(Essential Three) Posture.

Yoga is all about the spine, the superhighway for your nervous system and all of your energy flow. I’ll testify!

Except for an old football injury, the only back problem I’ve ever had was a nagging muscle issue. I went to the chiropractor, who probed both sides of my spine, each one of my vertebrae. Two minutes later, he pressed on one vertebrae wing. My right arm went dead. My back / muscle issue was rooted in the nerve flow regulated by one specific vertebrae wing.

Get started right now. Wherever / whenever you are sitting or standing, just straighten your spine! Add a little stretch and twist while you’re at it. If you’re like most you’re all tensed up and just that minimal movement will pop a few bones. It’s not just a 60+y.o. thing. A 10-minute daily routine called The Five Tibetans is a specific stretching sequence that flexes and aligns the spine in the optimal order. Key words….stretch, flex, align and routine. Stay tuned.

(Essential Four) Routine, First Cousin to Discipline. An old football coach said “practice the way you want to play, because you play the way you practice.” Very zen for a jock in the 70’s. But it holds true for sports, music, any hobby, relationships, anything. Including Chillin’.

Putting it all Together: Your first Mindfulness / Meditation session.

Discipline / Focus, Breathing and Posture are all in play. And this should quickly become a Routine for you. It won’t take long to learn or to realize the immediate payback. And you can do it any anytime anywhere, without anyone even knowing. EX: if I have a particularly crazy group of students, I’ll do it. If my blood pressure is too high at the doctor’s I say “give me a couple minutes”. They come back, re-do my BP, I’m great! So here’s what you do….

Posture, alignment. Sit in a comfortable chair–back straight, feet on the ground, thighs parallel to the ground. Rest your hands palm-down on your thighs. (option: cross-legged on the floor if you can. Spine MUST be straight!)

Control your breathing. Take slow and deep breaths, in through the nose and out through the mouth. Check your diaphragm, it should be moving.

Focus. Close your eyes, focus on every breath—the changing sound of the nose>mouth cycle, how the air feels coming in and going out, the movement of your stomach. Block out thoughts about anything else. Blocking may be rough at first—our minds are power-hungry dictators;

Expand your focus as you get more adept at this kind of breathing, graduating to “whole-body relaxation”. FOCUS-become fully aware of your body one part at a time, consciously relax that part. Focus on nothing but that body part and how it feels as you fully relax it. Move on, repeat.

Option to closing your eyes: use a specific focusing object to rest your eyes on. Don’t over-analyze the object, just rest your gaze on it. Let the object melt away, let your eyes glaze over. (it’s called spacing out, I can do this in a heartbeat). Candle flame works great, but I found it’s a little awkward to light a candle in a high school classroom.

BONUS environmental elements: especially when you’re starting out, if you can choose your location a quiet and secluded solitary place is ideal. Mood lighting (low) helps too.

Extra-extra bonus: music. Baroque = good. Rap and metal = bad. Stay tuned for Chillin’ Music.

Let’s Talk a Little Yoga…The Five Tibetans

How scary is yoga? You’ve heard all about your kundalini and seen the workout vids, right? Confession: until recently, to me “kundalini” was some kind of liqueur. I’m 63. I used to be in good shape, pretty athletic, active. But none of that has been high on my priority list for over a decade. I’ve never ever followed an exercise regimen of any kind, not even regularly walking. I have never ever watched what I eat, just within reason…a heart attack tends to bring you down to earth. I guess I’m lucky. Maybe stupid. My excuse: I hadn’t found the right routine for me.

I’ve always refused to consider contorting myself to the point of wondering whether I can untie my limbs from the crazy positions those yogis get into. And the Five Tibetans is traditional yoga. But I can easily do the Five Tibetans. It’s only a ten-minute sequence, longer only if you really get into it. But it will work wonders, and it’s scientifically validated.

More coming soon but read and get started now if you’re just dying (sorry), linked above.

Chillin’ Music

 Neuroscientists Discover a Song That Reduces Anxiety By 65 Percent. Excerpts:

Researchers at Mindlab International in the U.K. wanted to know what kind of music induces the greatest state of relaxation. The study involved having participants try to solve difficult puzzles — which inherently triggered a certain degree of stress — while connected to sensors. At the same time, participants listened to a range of songs as researchers measured their brain activity, heart rate, blood pressure and rate of breathing.

They found one song, “Weightless”, resulted in a striking 65 percent reduction in participants’ overall anxiety, and a 35 percent reduction in their usual physiological resting rates.

Interestingly, the song was specifically designed to induce this highly relaxed state. Created by Marconi Union, the musicians teamed up with sound therapists to carefully arrange harmonies, rhythms and bass lines, which in turn slow a listener’s heart rate and blood pressure, while also lowering stress hormones like cortisol.

DOUBLE-DIPPER APPLICATION.

Some people need structure or it’s not a “real” song. But sound of any kind is magical. Watch and listen in a quiet and soothing environment, staying focused on the sounds and graphics. And while you’re at it, do your controlled breathing. They’re meant to work together. Weightless, 8min version 

That’s it for now, kids. Like I said earlier, this is a draft / preliminary / introductory material only. We’re still in R & D / blueprint phase but if you like what you see, drop a line and we’ll keep you posted!

Live Long and Prosper-A Vulcan History Lesson

Logic is the cement of our civilization, with which we ascend from chaos using reason as our guide.” – T’Plana-Hath, Matron of Vulcan Philosophy

Vulcan history is a long journey from ancient civil wars that nearly destroyed Vulcan, to their embracing of logic through the teachings of Surak. Why did Spock’s home planet Vulcan turn its back on emotions in deference to logic?

Vulcans were once barbaric, war-like and “nearly killing themselves off with their own passions“. As half-human Spock put it “Vulcan, like Earth, had its aggressive, colonizing period; savage even by Earth standards. There was a time in the past when we were an extremely violent race. We nearly destroyed ourselves. Paranoia and homicidal rage were common.” A small group of early Vulcans, reported to be liberals, began to mentally train themselves to suppress their emotions.

None too soon. Vulcan was tearing itself apart. Rampant emotions and a hostile warrior culture led to many widespread wars using terrible weapons like atomic bombs and the Stone of Gol. But the philosopher Surak made a radical proposition: lead a life governed by logic rather than emotion. His teachings showed Vulcans a path towards peace and they quickly spread. Spock reflected on the shift to logic: “We were once wildly emotional, committed to irrationally opposing points of view, leading, of course, to death and destruction. Only the discipline of logic saved my planet from extinction.

Vulcans are not natural paragons of emotionless logic. They are actually far too emotional for their own good. Their natural disposition is quite earthly human: erratic, volatile and quick to anger. So they go to great lengths to suppress their natural feelings with disciplined mind control. The Vulcan embracing of logic includes an iron discipline about feelings – an almost Buddhist extermination of the ego, freeing the person from illogical emotional impulses.

Spock was only half-Vulcan, the offspring of a human schoolteacher and a Vulcan father. This created a deep, ongoing and powerful conflict between logic and emotion, described by Earth counterpart Leonard Nimoy as … “struggling to maintain a Vulcan attitude, a Vulcan philosophical posture and a Vulcan logic, opposing what was fighting him internally, which was human emotion.”

Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most… human. (Kirk’s eulogy for Spock)

The Vulcan culture survived and thrived. End of history lesson.

(Two sources for Vulcan history: http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Vulcan_history  and http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/the-vulcan-way-how-to-live-long-and-prosper-1672660.html

Is There a Lesson?

Earth is embroiled in civilization-threatening conflict. The dark side of our emotional human nature is becoming more and more dominant with greed, power-grabbing, corruption, indifference to others, brutal killings, senseless wars that are somehow always logically or morally justified.

But the Vulcan civilization survived a similar crisis and thrived. What can we learn from our distant homo sapiens cousins? Must we also banish emotions in deference to logic?

Earth’s humans face a dual threat: 1) rampant emotions and whacked out values fueling phobias and paranoia, hatred, bigotry, “me first” nationalism; and 2) blunt-force logic: cold, calculating, it’s-only-business, inhuman disregard for others in deference to profit, possessions  and power.

There’s a significant difference between Earth’s and Vulcan’s strain of homo sapiens. Our issue is more complex than Vulcans faced. Earth’s science community has determined that social-emotional attributes are what makes Earth humans human. Our emotional, impulsive, intuitive side is our redeeming quality, but it may also become our downfall.

Human emotion is as essential to our survival as the physical environment. We thrive on intangibles like sense of purpose, living by our values, healthy personal relationships, belonging / being part of a strong community. As social well-being has been found to intertwine with physical well-being these are critical to sustaining the species. It’s also been verified that social-emotional well-being drives achievement and success, as well as physical health and longevity.

But there’s a down side to strong emotions rooted in the way the brain and body interact.

Emotional input or negative experiences trigger a highly sensitized involuntary fear response that is so strong it can block out logical thought. These negative external stimuli can trigger brain trauma which causes the involuntary reactions due to our “fight or flee” instinct.  A traumatized brain can be a tired, hungry, worried, rejected, or detached brain which causes a person to have feelings of isolation, worry, angst, and fear.

When a threat, either real or perceived, is felt the brain and body both prioritize survival. Both go through changes to enable rapid scanning for physical warning signs and emotional signals of unsafe conditions.  We react to signals physiologically, our irritated limbic system increases blood pressure, heart rate, and respiration with an excessive secretion of stimuli—cortisol and adrenaline—pumping through our bodies.

We’ve long known about the potential physical damage from stress responses. Chronic activation of this fear response can damage parts of the brain as well as the body due to elevated stress levels. While humans are naturally social creatures that thrive on and crave social connection and attachment to others, if we encounter physical or emotional danger problem solving, reflection, and emotional regulation are compromised and diminished.

(Brain theory information is from Brains in Pain Cannot Learn! )

So, What’s a Human To Do?

For humans, our emotions are a good thing. We cannot survive without them. But an over-leveraged strength can become a weakness. So, how do we embrace our emotional strengths while keeping them in check? Mindfulness and meditation, even at a very basic level, can do wonders. So can rediscovering our true selves (purpose values, norms, belonging…). But body and mind are one system. So don’t forget the bean sprouts. And sensible exercise too. It’s not all esoteric pixie dust.

Humanity’s struggle to harness our emotions is a matter of species survival. Thankfully, there is a broad and potentially powerful awakening underway. Live long and prosper ….indeed! As Spock would exclaim, with one pointed eyebrow raised for added emphasis…. “Fascinating!”

To do or not to do what? That is the Activist’s Question

So much of this latest learning journey is brand new to me, it’s complex and a steep learning curve. If you have the interest, time and stamina please help me crawl up this incline. There are a lot of links to major resources below, hence the “stamina” thing. To fully grasp all of this will take a good deal of time and deep thought, but I hope you’ll join in the fun. Could be a wild ride once we get to the top and take off, although this is probably more like a never-ending adventure than a destination.

Adam Blakester of Starfish Initiatives notes that there are many more commentators offering opinions than activists willing to commit to a course of action. From Adam: “…we need more people to take on active roles/work in leading and/or supporting the great transition. Such roles are far more involved than recycling and going solar, as important as they are. Such roles are about influencing greater changes, creating solutions, new systems and knowledge, building capacity and a zillion more things.

In other words, more hands to the tiller and less arm-chair commentators and experts…being a good or better consumer is nowhere near enough.

Personal testimony–it’s far too easy to fall short of what’s needed: deeply committed hands-on activism. We’re collectively more aware, more concerned. But it’s far too common and more comfortable to stay at that first level—awareness, concern and some degree of doing stuff. For most, self included, it’s a matter of perceived constraints. How much can the average person do?

”I’d love to change the world, but I don’t know what to do. So I’ll leave it up to you”. (1971-Ten Years After)

Epiphany! That attitude is old-world and must go.

Changing the things we do is critical-we’re at a worldwide environmental tipping point. But “thing changes” are superficial and unsustainable if the underlying attitudes, belief systems, habits and support systems, policies, practices do not change. And not just among a group of wild-eyed, bushy-haired “activists” but among the general population. A tall order that needs a deeply committed activist or two.

I am passionate about making an impact and I want to commit to action. It so happens that my passion has always been social change so I guess I’m an anomaly. Specifically, I’m envisioning a sustainable social –emotional infrastructure that will give humanity a fighting chance to survive and maybe thrive. While my initial emphasis is young people, kids are not born intolerant or bigoted. Those are acquired values, so there must also be a concerted effort to impact adult biases—the effort must be systemic, must reach all ages in all sectors–education, home, workplace, communities, society, government. Whew….another fine mess.

Exploring Mr. Blakester’s Starfish organization led me to the Great Transition Initiative.  and prompted me to write a GTI summary post –I won’t go into detail about GTI any further here beyond this purpose statement:

The Great Transition Initiative is an online forum of ideas and an international network for the critical exploration of concepts, strategies, and visions for a transition to a future of enriched lives, human solidarity, and a resilient biosphere. By enhancing scholarly discourse and public awareness of possibilities arising from converging social, economic, and environmental crises, and by fostering a broad network of thinkers and doers, it aims to contribute to a new praxis for global transformation.

I fully buy into GTI’s current global state assessment and its vision of a feasible preferred future, mostly because that future is the only one that gives us a chance. In GTI’s constellation of values, my passion is human solidarity. My lifetime vision: a catalyst role in a broad greater good movement (Adam’s term for this is “care for the commons”) to rediscover our humanity, which to me is a social survival and planetary sustainability issue of the highest importance. We can partially repair our torn social fabric with common threads of purpose, shared values, social norms…in other words by collectively re-connecting with our humanity. Vehicle of choice: social-emotional learning (SEL).

That big hairy vision is not as far-fetched or out of reach as it may sound.

OBJECTIVE

Build a Fourth Sector social structure with systemic emphasis on the attributes known to promote higher levels of engagement therefore greater social and emotional well-being and performance excellence. (RE Fourth Sector–see diagram 2 from the Fourth Sector organization )

I’ve taught social-emotional learning in grades 4-6. Too academic, too teachy, too canned to grab kids by their emotions, to hit their hearts and get in their heads. Needed: self-discovery and reflection / experiential learning (learn from unlearning…a whole ‘nother ballgame but related).

Education is inundated with demands—STEM, common core, standard test performance. It’s not lack of interest as much as it is lack of bandwidth to be serious about SEL. Conclusion: a purely academic SEL pathway is not feasible. Rather, a partner resource for the education establishment could provides much-needed adjunct services and support. The resource would also build general awareness and be catalyst for a systemic all-stakeholder community environment that supports social-emotional development. Enter the Caring Communities Collaborative (model-diagram 1), a conceptual framework that’s been evolving over the last several years.

Meaningful Work

A recurring parallel theme kept jumping out in my new learning journey—meaningful work:

Our mad rush to accumulate wealth and a standard of living through material things and conspicuous consumption has degraded quality of life and endangered the sustainability of humanity. The way out: “create an environmentally and socially sustainable future that provides decent, meaningful work for all.”

(The Struggle for Meaningful WorkKent Klitgaard February 2017) 

Blakester responded to Klitgaard’s article, be sure to read his thoughts if you (WHEN you!) read The Struggle.  In my opinion, priority focus is not on “work” but “meaningful”. How do people find their purpose, their calling, their One Thing? Once people understand what is truly important to them, they will be thirsty and will demand that thirst is quenched. Services, structures, systems will emerge much more readily out of necessity, driven by demand.  

WHY SEL First?

Social-emotional learning is a vastly powerful and necessary force; it is the enabler of skills development and high achievement. “Really?” This is all backed up by a huge body of research….

The higher the S-E level, the more physical health and emotional well-being increases. Hard costs incurred from the broad spectrum of physical and mental health problems drop, as do related but harder-to-measure social costs. The quality of the workforce talent pool increases and the private sector’s bottom line improves in key measures like productivity, turnover, absenteeism, attrition.

Community prosperity follows private sector prosperity.

In education, higher levels of attainment and achievement are realized by more highly engaged learners. Costs associated with “problem students”—absenteeism and disciplinary issues drop.

Education, workplace and community excellence are directly impacted by mean, uncaring people, conflict and stress.  And one effect of rude, intolerant people is bullying in school and the workplace. The ultimate effect…violent acts against others and self-inflicted harm, up to suicide.

Economic growth requires increased productivity, which in turn requires a better educated, more highly trained and skilled population. The kicker: for people to fully develop their skills and embrace training, it must be meaningful and relevant to them…they must be fully engaged. The enabler: a community of lifelong learners with a high level of social-emotional well-being.

The Caring Communities Collaborative Model (diagram 1)

 

Diagram 2: from the Fourth Sector organization

Convergence toward a fourth sector, of the best from private, public, non-profit sectors

We can and must get back in touch with what makes us human beings We can and must re-connect with our natural Selves. We can and must re-connect with others and with the world around us. It’s not just our happiness, it’s our survival that’s at stake.

We are stardust, we are golden. We are billions-year-old carbon. And we’ve got to find our way back to the garden.

 

Global Sustainability–The Great Transition Initiative

Sometimes I accidentally stumble across a well-hidden door to a mysterious building. Construction is not always tenant-ready but some dwellings are occupied. Others have completed their entire life cycle and are ready for demolition. The most recent door is to an in-process project–the Great Transition Initiative, and one specific essay in particular from the GTI website on meaningful work. A two- tweetworthy excerpt of the Great Transition Initiative (GTI) narrative from the meaningful work essay:

Our mad rush to accumulate wealth and a standard of living through material things and conspicuous consumption has degraded quality of life and endangered the sustainability of humanity. The way out: “create an environmentally and socially sustainable future that provides decent, meaningful work for all.” (The Struggle for Meaningful WorkKent Klitgaard February 2017) 

A Great Transition is needed. We have maxxed out the earth’s capacity to support humanity, moving  dangerously close to or past the hard limitations of every critical resource needed to sustain the species—water, food, land, air.

Social sustainability may be even tougher to achieve. The Great Transition Initiative  explores the future Klitgaard references. This essay looks only at what and why. The more challenging “how” including meaningful work is later.

GTI first started taking shape a quarter century ago, and their message and approach resonates with me. Their assessment of the current global state and vision of a desired future, as well as the issues and concerns driving the initiative all align with what had been percolating in my head for some time. My goal for this post is to do what I can to promote the cause, we need a vast grass roots movement. As this is important stuff. I hope this short summary will push you to the GTI project.

This is also selfishly motivated. GTI is new to me, and this will help me to better understand the issues, the framework, and where I might fit in. Lots to explore, lots of opportunity for all of us.

About that pesky rubber-hits-the-road “how”:

(1) Meaningful applies not just to work but to the  development of young people and older folk alike, and to lifelong learning and growth. Humanity has lost its mojo—stay tuned.

(2) Engagement theory and the connection to social-emotional well-being, productivity and personal achievement holds great potential.  Leveraging attributes across-the-board for all stakeholders that enable people to more fully engage is a critical “how” in the great transition. See Supercharging Engagement.  Also, Supporting data.

CREDIT WHERE DUE! Italics are excerpts taken directly from GTI. 

**********

Where are we?

“Great transition” refers to a set of core concepts for understanding the contemporary world and shaping its future.

We’re a frog in a water-filled saucepan that’s slowly heating up on the stove top. We’ll be boiled alive before it registers that a life-threatening change is slowly taking place and we really should consider hopping out. The stage has been set for a potentially deadly clash of radically changed current state vs deep-seated past perspectives and practices. Something has to give.

GTI calls our current status the Planetary Phase of Civilization—the profound shift in the condition of society and the dynamics driving change: threads of interdependence—economic globalization, communications technology, and climate change are among the most salient—are binding people, places, and the wider community of life into a single social-ecological system.

These powerful forces are exerting all kinds of pressure on global systems. However….the worldviews and institutions of the past persist…counter-tendencies—local initiatives, post-consumerist subcultures, sustainability and justice campaigns, public awareness and concern, visions of another world—may portend a rising social force for addressing the systemic challenge of the Planetary Phase.

Operative word = “may” portend a rising social force. This isn’t something we can leave to chance.

Yes, there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run…..there’s still time to change the road you’re on (Zeppelin, of course)

Where are we going?

…contrasting paths into the future are possible, distinguished by the ways social-ecological crises and our collective response play out. These global scenarios fall broadly into three types: evolution, degeneration, and transformation.

(ONE) Evolution, Let It Play Out which quite likely would lead to degeneration. Basically doing the same old same old. Evolutionary / Conventional Worlds scenarios …incremental responses to 21st century challenges …free market solutions (aka: profit before people and planet, greed, corporate control, short-term focus on profit-earning action and results) and international cooperation for sustainable development (barrier: the uptick in populist movements, nationalism). However, the efficacy of market and policy adaptations is sharply constrained.

Translated: the probability of the same old same old working in this new global environment is slim to none. Or, per GTI:  a state-centric geopolitical order undercuts global imperatives, while the dominant development paradigm privileges profits over needs and economic growth over ecological resilience.

NOW                                   NEED

State-centric                       Global Imperatives

Profit                                   Need

Economic growth              Ecological resilience

 

The risk of evolutionary drift followed by catastrophic descent is all too real, yet by no means inevitable.

Where do we want to go? Make the Transition to Transformative

The only viable path toward sustainability and nothing less than survival of the species, is transitioning to a new paradigm redirecting the global trajectory toward a socially equitable, culturally enriched, and ecologically resilient planetary civilization. A walk in the park, right?

Very Macro “HOW”

Individualism to Human Solidarity

Consumerism to Quality of Life

Domination of Nature to Ecological Sensibility

  1.  The ascent of a constellation of values—human solidarity, quality of life, and ecological sensibility—to moderate (neutralize or eliminate are more appropriate words, but “moderate” is a start) the conventional triad of individualism, consumerism, and domination of nature.
  2.   Upon this normative foundation, governance and economic institutions can be redesigned to balance the imperatives for unity and diversity, to nurture social cohesion and eradicate destitution, and to support human well-being and a vibrant natural world.

Which is the toughest challenge–(1) to fundamentally change human nature and our core values / social norms?  Or (2) to change the strongly entrenched power base of systems and structures? Regarding the first challenge, humans are rabid about protecting the core of who they are and what they believe. Second challenge…those in economic and political power are violently protective of their gravy train. No rose-colored glasses. This isn’t a no-brainer.

OK…so how about what needs to come first—change people (1)  or change systems / structure, policies / practices (2)? My opinion: If you try to change something while retaining old mental models, perspectives, paradigms, values and norms you’ll go nowhere fast.

So, what would the Planetary Phase of Civilization look like?

Far from the end of history, a Great Transition would be alive with peaceful political contestation, cultural expression, and scientific exploration. Even as it opened a new and hopeful chapter in the story of civilization, a Great Transition would face the lingering scars and instabilities of a fading past and the unfathomable struggles of a distant future.

Maybe it’s out there but from what I’ve seen, the GTI project could use a stronger, clearer, more compelling narrative that everyday people will readily embrace. Create the case for change then build a critical mass of awareness and commitment. Schein’s burning platform works for me: if people are leery of making a blind leap of faith toward the new world, set the old world on fire (in a manner of speaking, not advocating arson!).

I am driven to further the GTI cause by boosting awareness in my own meek and minor way, to help make it absolutely clear that it’s life-threatening for the frogs to stay in the pan of water on the stove. To make the case abundantly compelling that to continue in this current reality is certain disaster and will eventually lead to certain extinction. That should be a pretty solid dose of WIIFM.

There’s already a good deal of thought and effort by many to secure a decent future for mankind, on a planet that we haven’t totally messed up.

The big need is grass roots…1) awareness and concern; 2) committed, involved activism-grassroots implies effort from many; 3) collaborative effort, synergy. Too many splintered initiatives can be counter-productive…where do I start, what do I do, who and what can I believe in? And 4) a sense of urgency to change the path we’re headed down.

There’s already a good deal of thought and effort by many to secure a decent future for mankind, on a planet that we haven’t totally messed up.

The big need is grass roots…1) awareness and concern; 2) committed, involved activism-grassroots implies effort from many; 3) collaborative effort, synergy. Too many splintered initiatives can be counter-productive…where do I start, what do I do, who and what can I believe in? And 4) a sense of urgency to change the path we’re headed down.

If you hear the calling share the word about GTI and find your own well-hidden door you’re your own mysterious building. We must build broad awareness by lots of people dropping pebbles into their own little pond. Ripple Power, baby!

Next Up: more in-depth how as proposed by the GTI project.