Tag Archives: education reform

Radical Unschooling Narrative for Neophytes

In Part One Confessions of a Radical Unschooling Neophyte I shared where I feel I can most contribute to the RU movement, and why I am compelled to be involved. By explaining my intent and point of view I hoped to convince others I’m able and determined to make a meaningful contribution.

Here in Part Two I’ll describe a few specific areas where it appears to me that RU could use some clarity, especially when it comes to other neophytes. The movement needs more boots on the ground beyond practitioners and a targeted PR effort will help in recruitment.

A Rose By Any Other Name. I’ll use “RU” until the community determines whether it should be called something else. No matter which label, we need to develop a compelling narrative for RU for the uninformed general population. That’s the target, it’s the only realistic one for my level of influence and expertise.

To regular people, “radical” and “unschooling” together is a downright baffling, scary term. And people tend to avoid that which is scary. Speaking of “scary”…RU folks are a unique breed, and that’s meant in a positive way. They are visionary, insightful, committed, values-driven, strong-willed. But that can be an issue. It’s difficult for regular folks to understand much less support RU if we can’t relate to practitioners and feel we belong as a meaningful part of the movement. RU needs a broad base of support for it to be all that it is capable of, and practitioners need to reach out, be more inclusive.

Un is a state of mind where trust is key, fear is a liar, and  compassion drives respect and acceptance. (Maggie at Process)

Embrace by Letting Go.  Unschooling is getting out of the way, letting kids’ naturally inquisitive and creative nature take over, letting go of authoritarian, control-freak parenting and teaching. But silent and deep runs the Dark Side of the Force and this is a real challenge for newcomers and long-time practitioners alike. We need some serious de-schooling.

Elevate Big Un Principles (is “Attributes” Better?) to the social norms they could / should be. Some in the RU community seem to resist having clear cut principles that define RU. Would that be too close to “rules” which would be such an un-Un control freak restriction, contrary to “letting go”? Principles represent a solid potential values system, one of the essential elements of developing strong group identity. Values are a “must” for internal cohesiveness and external growth, especially critical for those debating whether it’s safe to jump on board.

There is actually an abundance of principles-looking attributes that drive Un. They’re just not yet formalized into one “official list”, again that would be so un-Un. The biggest challenge would be agreeing on which attributes to include in “the” list. Is there already a one-size-fits-all collection of Un Principles?

Do What’s Natural. Beyond letting go, the most important thing a parent must do is to better understand the basics of human nature and brain theory–how our minds process information, especially young minds. Then make sure kids attain a high state of emotional development and readiness to learn, something traditional schools largely ignore. Parents have a good deal to learn to fully embrace unschooling and it has nothing to do with reading, writing and arithmetic. But first, embrace by letting go. “Trust in the Force you must, Luke!” Interesting.

Nimowashe is a Japanese bansai gardening concept: prepare the tree for planting. It is essential to craft the right environment conducive to relaxation, learning, creativity: provide the most comfortable and stimulating surroundings possible–lighting, music / white noise, kinesthetic doodads and mind-stretching playthings. Can’t get enough.

Provide, or Facilitate, the Environment? RU is letting go, empowering the learner to explore their own path in the environments of their choosing. “Craft the right environment” above is a different level. It’s not directing the child’s thinking, but providing the surroundings that sharpen their vision and increase their thirst. Nimowashe: prepare the tree for planting so whatever the learner explores has a fully receptive, maximum capacity container. We can enhance self-directed learning effectiveness through scientifically validated methods. Not methods of instruction or specific content, but elements that enable maximum freedom, creative thinking and learning to take place.

 Live Well and Prosper. This is so critical that it can and should still be “taught” and continuously reinforced–practices that keep the mind and body at maximum receptivity. Practices should be modeled with the young learner, a great way to connect by spending purposeful time together. Some adults have trouble with physical and mental / emotional / spiritual well-being: relaxation, mindfulness, basic yoga (call it “disciplined stretching”). Start young to develop good habits without pressure, a routine of fine-tuning the mind-body relationship. Not to prep for “doing something” like studying, but treating yourselves to a regular feel-good session practitioners learn to look forward to. “Good” chemicals are released and the body and mind learn to crave them. It’s an addiction but a positive one.

If a learner chooses at some point to really dive into the spiritual stuff it sure won’t hurt them or the world a bit. And isn’t that the way this unschooling is supposed to work?

Can You Go Part Way? My paradigms are strong. I’m aware that being unable to let go of every shred of ingrained authoritarian thinking is a personal barrier. This “environment” question is a prime example. Does RU necessitate total freedom to choose and explore whatever with no influence, or is it OK to provide the right environmental elements to fully empower the learner to choose and explore? (I know, I know…the answer is “yes!”). A bigger question: is it possible for home-schoolers to ease into RU, learning and applying a few of the principles for starters to get comfortable? OR even more challenging, how does a parent make the Grand Canyon leap from traditional to RU? Isn’t a little bit better than none? Practitioners weigh in, please!

_1 Factory Model of EducMaximum potential cannot be reached in a bricks and mortar classroom where administrators and traditionally educated teachers must pay homage to The Holy Curriculum and Pedagogy.

Well-Centered. Unschooling is an individual thing, no bricks and mortar needed. Buildings can even be artificial barriers…”you must go to school to learn.” Still, I can’t shake the notion of a “center”, an infatuation I’ll admit is selfish. It would allow non-practitioners a chance to support unschooling in a meaningful way even though, like me, they are past parenting.

Maybe a center is an unschooling-friendly location with all the right environmental elements for explorers, a resource center for those who can’t provide it on their own. Or an information source for people wanting to learn more or who need a little passive guidance.  An Un Center could host informal peer coaching or information-sharing events. DANGER! The moment there is too much structure, too many programs, we cross over to the Dark Side! A fine line.

One objection to RU is that it doesn’t provide enough socializing opportunities. How about hosting group gatherings? Not planned or structured activities, simply provide the place and a reason for un learners to come together and let whatever happens happen.  (Socializing Sidebar: “socializing” in the traditional school setting typically comes with heavy baggage– bullying among peers and rampant competitiveness, making alternative education even more attractive.

These are just a few RU talking points that I feel should be developed into the right narrative for neophytes. Now I need insights from the community. Where can I be best used for the greater RU good? Keeping the target in mind, what should the narrative be? Oh….forgot to mention: I have no interest in becoming “the” messenger. I’m happy with being part of crafting the message. But if I get the chance to be directly involved in delivery, I sure wouldn’t turn it down!

There’s so much deschooling we need, so much new to learn…a little help? I recently wrote a couple of blogs on all the above and more:

1.      Youth Suicides and the Skills Gap—Common Denominator?

2.      (Part Two) Living Large With This “Un” Thing.

These are work-in-process, on a low-traffic site I use to collect my thoughts and share with just a few people. If you get a chance, check them out. I do need your insights—thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Confessions of a Radical Unschooling Neophyte

I’m an Un uninitiate, a non-expert, non-practitioner but I’m more than an interested bystander. That’s got to change, because the radical unschooling movement mirrors what I’ve been searching for in the private sector: a creative, fun, exploration-intensive environment built on relationships of trust, honesty, respect, compassion and mutual respect. Workers deserve it and perform incredibly better under those conditions. So do kids. Data on job and academic performance, and on peoples’ overall happiness and satisfaction with life is plentiful.

Radical Unschooling (RU) is too extreme for some, or if they’re interested they may not know where to start. But traditional education is failing in so many well-documented ways that more parents are seeking alternatives. Mine field! Fads and hucksters sprinkled among genuine principles and real practitioners. Isolated local education systems are putting on “progressive” window dressings while staying mostly traditional, still bound to executing their marching orders. Limited changes = limited success, barely scratching the surface of what could be.

My outsider perspective can be useful to the unschooling movement. I’ve studied RU and have lots of neophyte questions. And my misperceptions are surely typical of other non-practitioners looking for education alternatives, or who may be Un supporters if they knew more.

This turned into a two-parter when I wasn’t looking:

  1. Where I feel I can most contribute to the RU movement, and why I am compelled to be involved. The latter will help readers understand my point of view and why I am so intent on making a meaningful contribution;
  2. A few specific areas where it appears to me the movement could use some clarity, a compelling narrative for other neophytes, an identity for the practitioner community.

Go Large. Un is a State of Mind, a Way of Life.  I’ve always been a Blue Sky Big Picture guy. What has really grabbed me is the growing school of thought that “The Big Un” references a whole lot more than unschooling. It’s a social movement and unschooling is just one element. The sweeping potential of Big Un needs clarity, and it needs to become more concrete for myself and for others. It’s the most personally compelling part of this mission.

More and more Un Believers are aware they’re making the world a better place. That bigness may scare some people off, but the significance cannot be ignored. Just for starters, if an adult is to fully understand unschooling as a practitioner, they must fully live it. And Big Un applies to big kids at work, in politics (hell, yeah) and for what ails us socially as well. Un offers the best shot we have at salvaging a better life in a more sustainable society.

Worth repeating: Big Un is humanity’s best shot at recapturing our humanity. It’s survival of the species. Practitioner parents—all of us—need prep work. And NOT in academics and pedagogy!

Looking Outward. PR for unschooling specifically and Big Un must build mainstream acceptance and support by targeting non-practitioners, everyday people. I am committed to growing awareness among others at the same beginner level of understanding as I, bridging a gap from the RU community to the general public, building broad grassroots support, possibly growing the practice of unschooling and broad adoption of Big Un principles. That is overwhelmingly compelling in its bigness. And it’s admittedly tough for me to focus in on RU only…for now.

For me to pursue this mission I first need to grow my own awareness and understanding of what’s right, what’s wrong. Maybe there’s no such thing as right or wrong, just “is”?

All of this has all been thoroughly dissected within the RU community already, and it would not only be delusional but rude to propose changes or offer grand new improvements. The goal is simpler: to promote awareness, greater understanding of, and support for RU–not within the community but among the everyday population, people like me.

We All Need a Little Good Press Now and Then

There needs to be a target adjustment for a PR awareness campaign. Why preach to practitioners and professionals? Hit the non-practitioners. Where I may provide value:

Break down the more baffling elements of Un to a basic, everyday people level:

  1. RU in general, including hefty doses of benefits selling. Short pieces for local media, presentations to local civic groups. Replicate, make readily available to others;
  2. Interpret scientific stuff that may scare potential practitioners away: brain and learning theory, early childhood development, environmental support elements. So much of that is gobble de gook to most folks, no wonder they don’t want to take the plunge.

I speak the private sector’s language and understand their thinking. Employers will more fully embrace and even come to prefer unschooled candidates when they understand what and who they will be getting. Employer WIIFM is clear: RU improves the quality and depth of the future talent pool, providing candidates with what the new work environment demands: highly adaptive critical thinkers who are creative and thirsty for new knowledge, and are more emotionally connected to their sense of purpose. No bricks in the wall here.

Make a non-threatening case for RU for the traditional education community. Our shared Mission One should target the most critical common denominator—our kids. This may be akin to juggling lit dynamite, but there are good people being held hostage by a bad system. I’m guessing some would be powerful allies, potential deep-cover operatives hidden among the hostages. Some have already managed to escape that authoritarian dictatorship and are part of the RU practitioner population. How do you converts feel about connecting with your ex-peers?

LIGHTNING BOLT….I hate internal arguments, they are not winnable. A real-time epiphany: is there such a thing as working within the system, is there value in trying to win over traditional educators? I’ve been plenty critical of the establishment, and rightly so. Is RU an all-or-none, revolutionary replacement of the current, broken system? Is coexistence at all possible?

The most compelling high-impact goal is to connect the dots: identify common themes, goals and needs among sectors. RU community > traditional education > government > community / society > private sector / business…we’re all in this together. With a systemic, all-stakeholder effort so much more would be possible. It’s more than parenting and child development. It’s a way of life and state of mind, a social transformation. But only if all understand and embrace The Big Un.

Why Do I Want to Be Involved?

We can and must do better for the kids, ourselves, society. Top personal drivers:

  • The traditional education system is doing irreparable harm to our young people. A top cause of the alarming increase in middle school suicide rate is academic pressure to perform. And to conform. Add peer bullying to the mix. America sees alarming spike in middle school suicide rate
  • Young people who do survive the education system are ill-equipped for college or the workplace, unprepared emotionally for life. It’s well-documented: the traditional system isn’t delivering the goods, and the system can’t or won’t respond to pressures to adapt.
  • US youth’s level of creativity and critical thinking is plummeting. Peter Gray examines this in As Children’s Freedom Has Declined, So Has Their Creativity, first posted Sep 17, 2012. It’s even more relevant today with the situation arguably worsening considerably. 
  • Kids cannot perform outside of standard, canned responses, memorized answers. The US is not doing so well there either by global standards. Creativity and critical thinking are the two most essential new workplace skills, and we’ve lost our edge. Our talent pool is shallow and muddy, and our ability to compete globally is in serious danger. The private sector guy in me says that’s unacceptable, it can be resolved.
  • I love my grandkids. If I live long enough to meet them, I’m sure I’d feel the same about their kids. I want to do all I can to ensure they all have a decent place to live, a fulfilling life. We cannot get there going down the path we’re on. It’s that simple.

The Biggie Closer. Our education system continues to fail our kids, we continue to lose them. RU is powerful in part because it allows kids to connect with their Self. We desperately need to re-connect with our humanity, for the good, no the survival, of kids of all ages.

Too many good people are soured on life. You can see it in their eyes, the spirit is sucked out of them. Their body language screams “I hate my life!” We’re wandering through the desert and we’ve given up on ever reaching the Promised Land. No purpose, no meaning, no fulfillment, no closure. We’ve done it to our Selves from early childhood on. And that’s wrong. We must win  back our mojo. It starts with Big Un as a way of life, state of mind.

Is that being a totally drunk-on-the-koolaid idealist? I think not. We need whole-life “Un”. And I like it. That’s why I care.

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Expert practitioners, your patience in helping me grow in my understanding would be greatly appreciated. Besides parts one and two, I’ve written other blogs on the above and more. These are perpetual works-in-process, on a low-traffic site I use to collect my thoughts and share with a select audience. If you get a chance, check them out. Help me learn, please?

1.      Youth Suicides and the Skills Gap—Common Denominator?

2.      (Part Two) Living Large With This “Un” Thing.

Part Two, Radical Unschooling Narrative for Neophytes is an overview of my neophyte perception of radical unschooling and the Big Un movement, and where my current understanding tells me we need more awareness and support by crafting a compelling narrative. I need your insights—thanks!

 

Youth Suicides and the Skills Gap—Common Denominator?

Peter Gray got me again. As Children’s Freedom Has Declined, So Has Their Creativity  was originally posted Sep 17, 2012 but just showed up again on my feed, and it’s even more relevant today. The situation has arguably worsened considerably in five years.

Gray writes: “In the business world as well as in academia and the arts and elsewhere, creativity is our number one asset.  In a recent IBM poll, 1,500 CEOs acknowledged this when they identified creativity as the best predictor of future success. It is sobering, therefore, to read Kyung Hee Kim’s recent research report documenting a continuous decline in creativity among American schoolchildren over the last two or three decades.”

The article details research methods, explaining how creativity had been accurately measured in the study. If you’re into analytics, read the article–I won’t elaborate here.

Findings summary: “children have become less emotionally expressive, less energetic, less talkative and verbally expressive, less humorous, less imaginative, less unconventional, less lively and passionate, less perceptive, less apt to connect seemingly irrelevant things, less synthesizing, and less likely to see things from a different angle.” (there’s a reason for that!)

We have automation to do menial, repetitive physical stuff, and artificial intelligence to even do some light lifting low-level, analytical thinking. The only way for humans to add value that machines and computers cannot (yet) replicate is our unique ability to think creatively. So kids and adults alike are losing the edge we used to have, and the very capabilities the new workplace most demands.

The economy and the nature of work, for that matter the world, have all changed. Education has not, and it shows. The US workforce is seriously deficient in the new skills, and it starts with poor preparation in school.

If you’ve read much Gray you know his position on traditional education. His concerns include the serious and lasting damage inflicted on our young people by rigidity in education, standard testing, no freedom to play, to explore, to really learn.

How much damage? This came along two days after the Gray article: America sees alarming spike in middle school suicide rate   Research shows that “…increased pressure on students to achieve academically, more economic uncertainty, increased fear of terrorism, and social media are behind the rise in suicides among the young.” And of course bullying, most of which takes place at school, by peers.

We dump our kids into a toxic environment and expect them to learn in ways that are contrary to their natural wiring, and they are not even developing the skills and attributes that may help them survive to adulthood and beyond. And the US workplace is crippled by a poorly prepared talent pool. Related?

Hello (hello…hello…) is there anybody IN there? Just nod if you can hear me.  Is there anybody home?

You’d think we’d eventually wake up and realize this is a life-and-death social and economic problem. We’re failing our young people socially and emotionally, even doing irreparable harm, and plodding along with antiquated teaching methods and curriculum. Along the way we’re trashing the economy and our global competitiveness. It’s more than a double whammy because the two issues are connected and compound each other’ impact.

We expect conformity, we demand following rules, rigidity. We condemn creativity, freedom of expression, exploration. It’s so contrary to human nature. And the same expectations, issues and profound, lasting damage applies to big kids too—at work, in politics, in social interactions.

Gray’s writings and the education reform movement are not just about education, it’s social reform. Much, much bigger than kids in school and the education system.

I’m not an expert, not a “real” educator (full-time subbing doesn’t really count) and I’m a dozen years removed from parenting. So why should I care so much about education and parenting, the way we treat and teach our children, the way we force them to “learn”? Why should I care that society is going down the tubes? I’m old enough, I can surely ride this one out to The End.

The driving purpose behind what I do is a need to to do my part to make the world a better place for future generations. I kind of like my grand children. Haven’t met their kids, and I doubt I’ll have the chance. But I bet I’d like them too. They are why I care, and why we all must care.

Resolution?

Suicide and the skills gap share a common denominator…the two issues are one. They need to be clearly connected and framed together, then a concise and compelling narrative developed: here is the central issue and here are the impacts.

Then share the resulting narrative to build grass roots awareness and concern. The need to act must be elevated to the pressing crisis status it deserves. Emotional well-being can be life-and-death for too many kids, then there’s sustainability of our way of life for all of us. High stakes.

We must attack the issues with a consistent, coordinated focus. But here’s a huge barrier: tons of organizations, armies of concerned people, so many that none seem able to get anything of substance accomplished. Turf wars, fragmentation, over-saturation, diminishing returns. Maybe more simply herding cats, bb’s in a boxcar.  Joiners and activists are mule and Clydesdale, no offspring out of that one. Chaos, anarchy, complexity, rampant A.D.D. Experts blowing their knows all over each other, comment threads akin to meth head babblings. Very few if any groups can stay on-topic and maintain focus on progressing toward a well-articulated common goal. Crafting, sharing and staying focused on a common goal—what a concept!

We need laser-sharp focus and a coordinated attack. Activity does not equal progress.

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Post Script: I Rest My Case

There’s technical writing and persuasive writing. Dissertations and journaling on a napkin. Investigative reporting and data analysis, and editorials / opinion pieces. Some folks scream if they don’t see annotations and scads of trustworthy numbers (an oxymoron!). Others could care less about style, sources and data–they’ll look further if they want to. I’m in the latter group. I can do the first examples of writing but at a price–my sanity. But we demand more and more technical expertise, less and less creative thinking. So we get a bunch of grown people sitting around highly polished tables, all fearful of being the first to raising their hand and say “I don’t understand”. Fear and angst in school and the adult world has taken root like a fast-spreading cancer.

Suicide PSS…

I just read a story about a young woman who hung herself several years ago in her college dorm room. Written from her mother’s perspective, it was a look-back at red flags. Her mother said: “I keep coming back to one such warning sign, one that is so obvious now. I don’t know how I didn’t see it: not worrying about future consequences.”

I’ve studied engagement theory and its relevance to young people, a spin-off of my business world involvements turned toward youth and education. One key measure of engagement for kids is their feelings toward the future. I’m no expert but there may be something there.

I taught 4th-6th grade guidance classes off and on for a year, 45 minutes for each class every 10 school days, social-emotional development, bullying stuff. Not nearly enough time. I waited impatiently for the material to turn the kids inward, to help connect them with their inner feelings, put a name on what they dream about, what they hope for, what truly makes them happy. On the flip side, what makes them unhappy, what they fear most. Identify the bogey man under the bed and exorcise it. But the curriculum never went there. So I did what I could to take the kids there off-script

Our education system continues to fail kids and we continue to lose them. One of the reasons radical unschooling is so powerful is that it enables and encourages kids to connect with their Self. We desperately need to re-connect with our humanity, for the common good….no, survival…of kids of all ages. Maybe we need to strive toward making “Un” a state of mind, a way of life?

(Part Two: Living Large With This “Un” Thing)

 

Living Large With This “Un” Thing

(July 24 REVISION NOTE) Maggie blogs about unschooling from a practitioner’s perspective and more at Process. She and I have batted definitions and concepts around online, in both public and private conversations. I’m a newcomer. She has become my go-to practitioner and sounding board, so I asked Maggie to reflect on an almost-final draft of this article. The result: a synthesis of her reactions, and my re-reflections on her input. Whose is whose? A lesson. Must be “ours”. This is all Maggie’s fault…thanks, Maggie. I mean that, seriously.

Defining “It”…A Snipe Hunt?

Deming said we must operationally define something before we can truly understand it. Same meaning for everyone every time. So, what the heck IS “radical unschooling”? Is it a subset of alternative education? Some form of extreme homeschooling? I’ve learned that saying stuff like that is likely to put a radical unschooling practitioner on the offensive right off the bat, simply by expecting them to clarify and define what “it” is. Doing so is evidently so…. un Un. Maybe you need to really live “it” to really understand “it”?

The philosophical counter is “the question isn’t ‘what IS it? The answer is what it ISN’T”. OK…do we even need a definition? This is a whopper of a dilemma: terms drive perception, perception drives acceptance, acceptance leads to action which triggers change. To which my friend Maggie observed: “Terms are innocent little beings. Conditioning about the terms drives perception.”

One of Maggie’s recent posts was a quote from Beverley Paine, a practitioner in Australia, used with permission: “Radical unschoolers take the principles of unschooling and apply it holistically across all areas of life, not just to the ‘education’ of their children. It’s not simply living without school and the whole school paradigm of education, and it’s way more than living without ‘boundaries’ and ‘rules’ – it’s living with trust and respect, relationships and connections as the drivers of all actions.”

My first response:  Nice! So it IS a social-cultural evolution (revolution?), and it is truly a radical one. Can you imagine a “traditional” business going Un? Politicians “living with trust and respect, relationships and connections as the drivers of all actions”?? An un-society?! Maybe the holdup with broad acceptance is how do you “do it?” (dammit, there I am needing a roadmap again…) Waiting for the instruction manual, a cookie cutter recipe. But then, you don’t “do Un” do you?

Maggie’s reply: In the early days, I’d say, “Instead of rules, we have principles.” It starts with raising babies with responsiveness (instead of reacting to the baby) and compassion (instead of “training”). The longer you do it, the more you realize that if everyone in society did this, government would transform or not be needed at all. Enter voluntaryism, (a mindset not an action) that mindful living with respect that softens the harsh stereotype that follows misunderstood anarchy around!

There is no cookie cutter recipe, dear society, you know why?? Because it requires going within, deschooling internally and accepting one’s own self healing from patriarchy, and then spiraling out as the gifts we give to the world. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. But, as individuals not matching cookies.

Seems the RU community struggles with definitions too, although many just say “defining it is so un-Un!” Maggie has been “…trying to evolve towards new terminology.” One descriptive phrase is “whole life evolution without school.” And another: “…unschooling is really unconditioning (breaking away, deprogramming) from the authoritarian paradigm…to apply it to all of life for me and for (son) Sean, I am choosing the term evolution. For now. That’s the thing about RU, the process IS continuously evolving. The mold cannot be static.”

I’m well aware I am in full-tilt-boogie unconditioning (deprogramming?) mode, and that my personal evolution is bound to continue. Evolution…maybe that’s what this is all about?

When a practitioner talks about why unschooling works…the “principles” if you will, it always strikes me. These are a mirror of principles of effective leadership, building strong relationships, creating a society that’s vibrant and alive. There’s a whole lot more than “radical unschooling” here.

What attributes and knowledge might hasten humanity’s collective evolution? These are pertinent areas where I feel we need a whole lot more understanding. Add yours, please!

  • Exploring the human condition, understanding human behavior on both the “me” and “us” level: what makes me who I am, what makes us who we are? Where do I want to go on my journey, how we can take the journey as a tribe? Because humans are naturally social creatures, and it’s a lot more fun when you’re in good company too!
  • “Diversity” on Steroids. Inclusion, individuality, valuing differences….each person is a sovereign individual with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness…do we really buy into those words? If so, why is the notion of following our intrinsic motivators, of identifying and exploring our own unique path so objectionable?
  • The social sciences, as opposed to stuff-in-a-beeker science only;
  • Understanding how humans really learn and promoting the right methods and learning conditions that allow each individual to grow and thrive rather than being so intent on restricting our natural state and stuffing ourselves into standard compartments;
  • Civil discourse. Advocacy helps to get your point of view recognized…but how much? Senge, Bohm and others have explored the roles of inquiry and advocacy in meaningful dialog. Without getting too conceptual, fact is we’re lousy conversationalists and even worse at effective group decision-making. And isn’t that what makes democracy and society go around? Passive, aggressive, or assertive: which is ideal? In middle school, it’s taught that door #3 is the grand prize. But the school environment produces passive kids and is teeming with aggressive teachers. Physician heal thyself)
  • Re-awakening, re-connecting, becoming fully aware individually and collectively;
  • Civics, government (used to be “social studies”)…what it means to be an informed, involved citizen in a democratic society. Learning how awake and aware people can and must work within the system to change the world. Know the ropes, make a difference.

Sidebar: it says above that “people can and must work within the system to change the world”. To which Maggie replied “But I’m working outside of the system right now, and making a difference!” I think what I’m thinking is driven by impatience to see something of substance take hold and move mountains. Individual practitioners are fiercely independent, as they should be. It takes personal commitment and action, no cookie cutters allowed! But is there such a thing as influencing others’ evolutionary process, of influencing society? If so, would it be more feasible working from within?

We’re sadly ignoring the above crucial learnings for the most part, swimming upstream against our human nature. And it’s sapping our strength. That cluster of esoterica enables explorers to fully embrace the three R’s with a purpose. Why not go with the flow, let the game come to us? Reading, writing and ‘rithmetic must take a back seat. We’ll more completely master the three R’s only if and when it serves our purpose to do so. Otherwise it’s non value-adding noise, and force-feeding begets stress, burnout, failure. This is really tough for traditionals to come to terms with; it flies against the winds of authoritarian education, relationships, society.

Un doesn’t just apply to kids and unschooling. What are the impacts of un un behavior (read that carefully) on the workplace, government, society? Un-un leads to stress, burnout, failure, dysfunctional relationships, and toxic, me-first competitive and confrontational environments. Sounds familiar?

We need a serious dose of unadulting.

Sidebar Two: the term “the three r’s” is obsolete as all get-out, and I’m dating myself. Traditional education’s methods and curriculum are obsolete too. We may as well still be doing the three r’s.

Back to Defining The Big “It”

  • “It” is basic stuff—leadership attributes, engagement and motivation theory;
  • “It” is science and research-based: brain research, learning theory, music therapy;
  • “It” is spiritual–mindfulness, flow, yoga, meditation;
  • “It” is personal–social-emotional development / emotional intelligence.

“It” is a virus, we’re all carriers. “It” is leveraging what we know about all that stuff to illuminate the path toward sustainable fulfillment, first for ourselves then for our kids and anyone around us. “It” is sharing firsthand accounts of how Un has truly made a difference in our lives, “it” is drinking up our human nature, because it tastes amazing. “It” is helping others to more fully understand because we need them. Individuals can accomplish things, but only when we reach critical mass will we enable the continuing evolution of human consciousness on a grand scale. Just my opinion!

I’ve been soap-boxing this over and over forever, because I truly believe it’s a species survival issue. We have a desperate need to reconnect with our self-worth and our humanity, with our Self, with others, with the world around us. Once connections start growing, the healing begins and the good spreads. Crossover kicks in once the Self is well-connected. Like a brain’s pathways healing after a stroke, other connections come so much easier. It’s natural, it’s the way we’re wired.

Big Bucks Questions….

So you can’t “do” radical unschooling without first changing your Self and your little corner of the world. Makes sense. But, how can you further the cause with others? How can you help fence-sitters and non-believers see the light and, better yet, engage? Go back to the para after the bullets.

Why stop at “unschooling”? Un is a state of mind and a way of life–a movement. It may sounds a little crazy, but let your latent creative Self connect with that grand notion and envision what it would be like to step up to the all-you-can-un, no time limit buffet. You may not want to leave.

It Starts With Me. I’ll take one big honkin’ plate…just one at a time.

Part One connects rising youth suicides and the workplace skills gap, here.

Re-thinking Purpose and Roles in Education>Training>Development>Skills

Sometimes new input comes in waves. When that happens it’s hard to ignore no matter how strong preconceived notions may be.

I have not been a fan of the US education system. It is unresponsive to the needs of the real world and graduates are completely unprepared to go to work. So they are very likely to struggle on their first job and all-too-often fail. One of my pet projects over the past fifteen years is code-named Real-world Prep School, an enhancement to traditional education. It is designed to do what the pet name says. I’m convinced it would contribute toward saving the world, but the rules and definitions keep changing on me!

The more you study the more you learn, the more your understanding grows. Targets change.

A friend of mine shared an article that is really working hard to change my thinking. I do agree with the article that a broad, liberal education is critical for real-world preparation, a.k.a. “life”. Educators educate, when they’re not doing research or writing articles and books. But who or what prepares students for work?

How about this deal? If the private sector is grousing about the lack of qualified candidates, they should be the workplace prep instructors for those allegedly unqualified candidates. “Don’t bring me problems, be part of the solution”.

I’ve been guilty of having blinders on, of not seeing the truly systemic potential. We need to re-think the purpose and roles of the entities involved in education, training, development and workplace skills training.

First, a proposed macro goal for the full cycle of education > training > development > skills:
Provide every child, youth, adolescent, adult and senior (every human being, all ages!) with every opportunity to be all they can be.

Second, a little WIIFM to entice the private sector to partner with education: it’s Payback Time! Forward-thinking companies that nurture their employees’ and local community’s development get something in return, and it’s nothing to sneeze at: (1) a more highly engaged workforce—major bottom-line payback; (2) the highest regard in the surrounding community—image, branding, CSR; (3) elite status as employer-of-choice—current employees tend to stay, new candidates stand in line to get in—huge impact on both retention and recruiting; (4) a culture built on an absolutely solid foundation shaped by integrity and social consciousness; and (5) a deep talent pool stocked with healthy, readily available job candidates. Barring major marketplace meltdowns, this is a surefire strategy for sustainability.

Third: WIIFM for education system owners to play along. Squirrels climb trees, rabbits run. Let the Rabbits Run. Why do we expect our academic experts to be job trainers? That’s as silly as expecting rabbits to learn how to climb trees. Educators educate. More later!
Another carrot for educators: when education is perceived as providing maximum value and attaining goals, the theory is they will (or should!) receive maximum reward. Money talks, BS and MBA walks.
A few excerpts follow from the article my friend shared that got this train on the track: (From College Shouldn’t Prepare You for Your First Job. It Should Prepare You for Your Life) http://www.newrepublic.com/article/120405/wesleyan-president-money-anxiety-corrupting-higher-ed?utm_content=buffer3be02&utm_medium=social&utm_source=nfrb&utm_campaign=20150803))

“If we make money the object of man-training,” W.E.B. Dubois wrote at the beginning of the twentieth-century, “we shall develop money makers but not necessarily men.” He went on to describe how “intelligence, broad sympathy, knowledge of the world that was and is, and the relation of men to it—this is the curriculum of that Higher Education which must underlie true life.” A good pragmatist, DuBois knew that through education one developed modes of thinking that turned into patterns of action. As William James taught, the point of learning is not to arrive at truths that somehow match up with reality. The point of learning is to acquire better ways of coping with the world, better ways of acting.
      Pragmatic liberal education in America aims to empower students with potent ways of dealing with the issues they will face at work and in life. That’s why it must be broad and contextual, inspiring habits of attention and critique that will be resources for students years after graduation. In order to develop this resource, teachers must address the student as a whole person—not just as a tool kit that can be improved. We do need tools, to be sure, but American college education has long invited students to learn to learn, creating habits of independent critical and creative thinking that last a lifetime….
      .…In the nineteenth century, Emerson urged students to “resist the vulgar prosperity that retrogrades ever to barbarism.” He emphasized that a true education would help one find one’s own way by expanding one’s world, not narrowing it: notice everything but imitate nothing, he urged. The goal of this cultivated attentiveness is not to discover some ultimate Truth, but neither is it just to prepare for the worst job one is likely to ever have, one’s first job after graduation.”
(The New Republic Nov 26 2014 by Michael Roth, president of Wesleyan University)

More Input! Just In, From Humans of New York–(Pakistan Style) https://www.facebook.com/humansofnewyork/photos/a.102107073196735.4429.102099916530784/1045192165554883/?type=1&fref=nf

“Education changed the lives of my entire family. Before education, we knew only how to work. It was always very quiet in our home. My grandfather was a laborer, but he paid to send my father to a tutor so that he could learn to read. He told my father that, if nothing else, he should begin by learning how to read and write his name. When I was born, my father taught me how to read. I started with local newspapers. I learned that our village was part of a country. Then I moved on to books. And I learned that there was an entire world around this mountain. I learned about human rights. Now I’m studying political science at the local university. I want to be a teacher.” (Hunza Valley, Pakistan)

The first of many great reader comments: “Imagine what he will pass on to his own children.” Imagine, indeed.

(should end Part One here and do a follow-up, but plowing ahead if you’ll hang with me…)


 

Proposed: A New System
Repeat: don’t bring me problems, offer solutions. Following is a humble, rough offering that is begs for your input. Just a couple of starter thoughts….

Levels of Learning, Talent and Strength vs Age / Grade Segregation
The draft list of topics as they are roughly grouped below could be inaccurately perceived as following learner age, the traditional model of “Johnny is this old, therefore he’s in that grade”. When Johnny doesn’t keep up with others his age and grade level, he may get “special needs” attention. Or, he may get passed upward through the system anyway, especially if Johnny is a star athlete. In the private sector it’s called pencil-whipping. Or book-cooking.

On the flip side, if Johnny is exceptional in a particular subject, or advanced all the way around, some rare and exceptional programs will leverage Johnny’s abilities as a gifted learner. But typically, Johnny gets bored at the level he is stuck in, or he effortlessly breezes through a subject while others struggle. Because he’s gifted and not “a problem” Johnny doesn’t get the attention other students get. Johnny’s drive and ability soon dims, and we achieve our sacred standard results from the mediocrity-nurturing process. NCLB can mean No Child Gets Ahead too.

The age / grade segregation paradigm must be abandoned!

The more sensible way: learners progress through a matrix of topics, mastery is demonstrated before the learner moves on to the next. Eliminate the artificial age / grade boundaries and group learners with others at a similar level of capability and achievement. The group is challenged with as much learning as the learners can handle, and learners progress when they have demonstrated readiness.

If you’re still with me, need your input, please!

A Little Help…What are the Topics, by “Level”? Here’s just a little to salt the mine, with traditional education levels referenced as an anchor only!

(ONE-Earliest Learners. Preschool) Learning to learn; creative exploration; early social skills—sharing, teamwork, collaboration.

(TWO-Early Elementary) Social and civic skills; progressive social skills—values and normalizing factors; self-awareness (other strategies for growth and personal success: empathy / emotional intelligence, volunteerism, inclusion, global citizenship); physical and spiritual well being.

(THREE-middle through high school) Progressive expansion of earlier subjects (ref TWO); researching and analyzing information; technology toolbox; higher-level problem analysis and resolution; communication and interpersonal skills;

(FOUR-“Higher” Education) Deep-dive into the humanities and understanding the human condition; engagement / motivation theory, spirituality, global awareness; the impacts of philanthropy and volunteerism, significant project completion required. This level has little to do with workplace skills prep, beyond stuff like macro economics to understand at systems-level.

(FIVE-finally, workplace skills) Meaningful skills development does not happen in a vacuum, it takes hold only when there is a focus, a purpose. What good does skills development do if it is not to be used immediately and if it doesn’t meet a real need?

A Little More Help…Who are the SME’s Best Suited to Provide Guidance for Each Topic?
Hint: squirrels climb trees a whole lot better than rabbits. Let the Rabbits Run.
https://craigalan.wordpress.com/2010/07/14/let-the-rabbits-run-redux/

Align! Leverage the strengths of the providers, promote ownership among a broad coalition of local educators, private sector and community leaders, coordinate efforts.
Align Some More! Approach and goals must be consistent among topics and levels. EX: if we preach and teach creative exploration in early education, we can’t turn around and demand conformity and standardization later!

Start Local, One Pebble Into One Pond!

There’s no need to pass national legislation. A local alliance among community leaders, education and the private sector can reshape the local mountain range.

A solid education system is a catalyst for economic and community growth: young couples move to areas with progressive education opportunities for their kids, companies relocate to areas with an innovative education infrastructure that provides a highly skilled work force. The economic strength of the community grows and overall well-being and quality of life for its citizenry grows as well.

How can you say “but that’s not possible” to an ‘everybody wins’ opportunity like that?